Honda Amaze Facelift Review & Test Drive

Honda Amaze Overview

Honda has launched the all-new Amaze in India in the highly competitive compact sedan segment. Unveiled at the 2018 Delhi Auto Expo for the first time, the compact sedan boasts a completely new design inspired by the bigger sedans from the Japanese brand. Also, it gets a refreshed styling and features inside the cabin along with wide range of advanced safety features. Not only that, the car gets CVT with both petrol and diesel engines making this one of the most desirable car in the segment.Apart from the styling and updated new features, the paddle shifter and improved performance have made the sedan much more appealing.   Honda Amaze price range in India is between 5,62,960/-to 8,99,900/ check for detail pricing of Honda Amaze in Carzprice

bigintmedia.in

Honda Amaze Design

The previous-generation Amaze was based on the Brio hatchback and that reflected in its overall design. However, this second-generation model has been developed from scratch and its platform will serve as a base for future Honda models. The new car sheds 40-60kg due to the use of high tensile steel that’s lighter yet stronger than conventional pressed steel panels. Honda claims that the overall structure has been further strengthened, cross sections have been beefed up and crumple zones are stronger now, making the car ready to meet all upcoming crash test regulations.Like the older generation, the dimensions of the Amaze have been restricted to sub-four-metres, qualifying it for a lower tax structure. It is 5mm longer and 15mm wider than the car it replaces, and the front and rear track have increased by 23mm and 28mm, respectively, so its stance feels more planted and proportionate than before. The wheelbase has gone up by a significant 65mm to 2,470mm.

The overall design is very different from the older car – it is smart, stylish and doesn’t look like a compromised compact sedan; instead, it looks more expensive now. A talking point of the Amaze’s design – and one that divides opinion – is the vertical grille that looks like the car has rammed into a wall. But to many, the chunky chrome grille looks really good. Even though the wheels are an inch larger than before, at 15 inches, they appear a size smaller and don’t fill the large wheel wells nicely and the design seems bland, especially when compared to what Maruti offers. Unlike the distinctive two slashes on the older car, the waist line now is subtle. The biggest change, however, is at the rear where the ‘C’-shaped tail-lamps give the car a mini-Civic-like look.

Honda Amaze Cabin

Honda has really gone to town with the new Amaze. Even the cabin has been fully updated with a sleek new layout and new materials. You get a nicer looking instrument cluster with plenty of driving related information and a new multimedia display with built in navigation, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. The Amaze now even gets push button start, keyless entry and LED turn indicators on wing mirrors. The quality of plastics are on part with the segment, however, it isn’t as consistent as the Hyundai Xcent.Moving onto space and comfort, the front seats are wide and well padded, however, we would have liked some more thigh support. On the plus side, we didn’t have any complaints with the rear seat comfort as the bench itself is nicely contoured and the seat base is long enough to keep under thigh support in check.

The only downside is that the cabin isn’t wide enough to have three people at the back in total comfort. Visibility all around is pretty good, with a large windscreen along with plenty of glasshouse with the front and rear windows. All the controls up front are logically laid out and easy to use although we found the steering mounted controls a little too small for our liking. Finally, the 420-litre boot is slightly larger than the old car but the loading height isn’t the best in its class.

Honda Amaze Engine

Given that most of you probably are keen to know about how the diesel CVT works, we will get on with it first. To begin with, Honda has detuned the 1.5-litre diesel engine to make it work more efficiently with the CVT gearbox. As a result, it makes 80bhp and 160Nm (as against 100bhp/200Nm as standard). However, within minutes of driving the CVT equipped variant you can feel the improvements in driving comfort. Firstly, Honda has put in some work to make the engine less noisy and improved the sound deadening. The diesel clatter, as a result, is well subdued compared to the old car.

Secondly, the turbo lag has gone down considerably compared to the manual. Sure, there is still that strong pull around midrange and the car will effortlessly climb up to highway speeds but the difference here is that the CVT masks nearly all of the lag with the way it works. That said, just like every other CVT, this one has a rubber band effect too which means flooring the pedal will have the revs climb up immediately. The gearbox even has an S mode which keeps the revs high for better pulling power. However, under heavy throttle you can hear a lot of diesel clatter in this mode compared to when you put it in drive.All in all, this engine gearbox combination works better than the petrol CVT Amaze if you are after effortless performance and efficiency. In the corners, the Amaze isn’t as sharp as the Ford Aspire or even the Maruti Dzire but feels balanced nonetheless and offers good body control and feedback from the steering which contribute to above average dynamics in this segment. As for the ride quality, the car absorbs most of the rough stuff with ease thanks to the well calibrated dampers. Still, expansion joints and sharp-edged inconsistencies can be felt in the cabin and at high speeds there is some amount of vertical movement especially when the car is loaded. It’s not a deal breaker though just a point worth making.

Honda Amaze Driving

The Amaze is softly sprung and the travel range of the suspension is quite long. While this results in good bump absorption over broken roads, it crashes over sharper ones. Although ground clearance is rated at 170mm, with a full load of passengers, the rear suspension compresses quite a bit (just like the old Civic), so the car is susceptible to scraping its underbelly over speed breakers. At higher speeds, the Amaze bobs a bit more than usual over expansion joints and vertical movements over wavy surfaces are noticeable.Its steering has some weight to it, more in the diesel than the petrol, and while it remains consistent, it isn’t very precise. The turn-in isn’t sharp like its rivals and it doesn’t feel agile or willing to change direction quickly. Understeer (or the car’s tendency to continue in a straight line despite turning the steering) is noticed a fair bit when driven briskly. Body roll is on the higher side, again as a result of the softer suspension set-up. What’s nice though are the brakes that offer great feedback and inspire confidence while shedding speed.

Honda Amaze Safety

The new Honda Amaze gets several safety features that include dual front airbags, ABS with EBD, child seat anchor points and seatbelt warning. The structure itself is capable of absorbing impact offering better protection to the occupants.Honda has equipped the top VX variant of the Amaze with all the features that we’ve come to expect from a car at this price, like the 15-inch alloys, shark-fin antenna, keyless entry, start/stop button, electric folding mirrors, 7.0-inch touchscreen, reverse camera, climate control and cruise control. Safety kit like ABS with EBD, dual front airbags, Isofix child seat mounts and parking sensors are standard across the range. The CVTs, however, are available only in the lower S and V variants, which also get a 2-din audio system with Bluetooth instead of the touchscreen. The petrol-auto gets segment-first paddleshifters as well. The Amaze still misses out on some features that its competitors get, like projector LED headlamps, daytime running lamps, rear air con vents, auto-dimming rear-view mirror, driver armrest and a cooled glovebox. View offers on Honda Cars from Honda dealers in Hyderabad at Autozhop

Honda Amaze Price

Honda Amaze Ex-Showroom Price in India ranges from 5,62,960/- (Amaze E MT Petrol) to 8,99,900/- ( Amaze V CVT Diesel). Get best offers for Honda Amaze from Honda Dealers in India

Honda Amaze Verdict

So there you have it, the new Honda Amaze. It’s bold, its aggressive looking and in many ways better than the old car. You get more features as standard, a better looking cabin and a whole lot of convenience as you get the CVT gearbox in both petrol and diesel engine options. On the other hand, what lets it down is the inconsistent cabin quality and a mediocre petrol engine. Given the wide range of engine and powertrain options, Honda is clearly aiming at the Maruti Suzuki Dzire which also gets an automatic for both petrol and diesel versions. However, the Amaze CVT could become noticeably more expensive since CVT technology comes in at a much higher cost compared to the relatively rudimentary AMT gearbox.

Honda Jazz Engine & Test Drive

Honda Jazz Overview

Premium hatchbacks have defied the general consensus of bigger is better, a rare reality in the size conscious Indian car market. Honda was first to bring in a premium hatchback with the second gen Jazz last decade, the vehicle being the most expensive hatchback at that time. A facelift and a massive price correction did no wonders and the Jazz continued to do rather poorly on the sales chart, leading to its ultimate discontinuation. Honda India pulled the plug on the Jazz a couple of years back so it could focus on mass market products like the Amaze and now with the compact sedan doing well, the big Honda hatch is making a return. The Jazz is a very successful product for Honda, the company having sold more than 5.5 million units across 75 countries, with 11 countries producing the vehicle. So why should we sit up and take notice? Because in its last outing, the Jazz did not have a diesel mill, it was also lower on local content but this time around, the Earth Dreams oil burner finds its way to the Jazz (India is the sole country in the world were a diesel Jazz exists as Europe doesn’t get it and no diesel Jazz exports will be done by Honda India) and the vehicle has more than 90% localisation!  For information on contact details of Honda car dealers in Kolkata

incmanifesto.in

Honda Jazz Look

The Honda Jazz 2016 is based on the new Honda City and is 55mm longer than the previous generation. Honda internally calls this design as Crossfade Monoform design. The fascia of the Honda Jazz 2016 resembles the Honda City. It has a similar front grille, though it doesn’t get the chrome finish. Honda is targeting the Honda Jazz 2016 for the youth or those you prefer trendy styling over subtle. The headlamps are single barrel and the front bumpers are different from the City.

The side profile of the Honda Jazz 2016 is a lot similar to the previous generation as it still retains the same design philosophy like the quarter glass panel, blacked out pillars and the large glass-in area. The tail lamps and rear styling too remind you of the previous Jazz, but it does look fresh with LED tail lamps.

Honda Jazz Space

Open the large doors and an all black theme welcomes you. They do instill a sense of Deja Vu as the cabin borrows heavily from the Honda City. The centre console sits at the focus, and it comes with a very neat assortment of buttons and switches. The piano black finish for the entire console brings a premium aura to the entire cabin. We’re sure that you’ll love the 6.2-inch touch screen that is incorporated into the console, and a noteworthy point is that it comes along with DVD playback, navigation and can play music from a host of inputs.

Arranged right beneath this is a feather-touch climate control screen, with controls spread out right underneath it. While it does look cool and futuristic, operating it on the go is a bit of a bother. While we have no complaints on the performance of the air-conditioning, we have to point out that the fan is awfully loud.Integrated into the centre console, in front of the gear-knob are two cup holders. Three more storage slots have been put in place of the armrest, and this may go as a strong bonus for some, and a slash in comfort for others.

The steering wheel is just the right size and feels good to hold. However, it skips out on telescopic adjustment (VW Polo has it). The wheel is shared with the Honda City. The difference, notably, is the lack of cruise control buttons. The basic audio controls have been incorporated into the left, while the telephone buttons are placed behind the wheel.As for the instrument cluster, the dials lack the illuminated blue rings that you’d find in the City. The three-pod instrument cluster house the tachometer, speedometer and a multi-information display (MID). The MID reads out trip details and average fuel efficiency. The pod also houses an instantaneous FE meter, a readout for the outside temperature and the fuel gauge.

There is decent amount of bolstering for lateral support. Even people with heftier builds will have little reason to complain here. Cushioning is adequate and the seat also gets height adjustment. Getting into a comfortable driving position is not a big task, although a telescopic adjust on the steering wheel would have made it much easier. The rear bench is amongst the most spacious in its segment. Sitting three abreast is possible. Knee room and headroom are amongst the best in its class. A noteworthy feature is that the rear bench can recline by a couple of degrees to the back. For someone who dislikes the upright seating posture, the reclined posture keeps the lower back a lot happier.The Jazz also gets something Honda chooses to call ‘Magic Seats’. The rear bench can be folded in multiple combinations, enabling the user to tailor space according to his/her needs. A segment exclusive feature, which is sadly restricted to the top-variants.

Honda Jazz Gearbox

Under the stubby hood of the Jazz one can find either the popular 1.2-litre i-VTEC petrol or the relatively new 1.5-litre i-DTEC diesel motor. While the former is available with either a 5-speed manual or a CVT automatic, the diesel car gets a 6-speed manual similar to that of the new City. Starting with the petrol motor, this 1.2-litre unit is a familiar unit, previously seen in a range of Honda models including the Brio, the Amaze and even the old Jazz. Known for its refined nature and strong mid-range grunt, it produces 90bhp of power and 110Nm of torque, and in the new Jazz it retains those characteristics. During our stint behind the wheel, the petrol-powered Jazz felt fairly satisfying (if not thrilling) to drive, although I was bound to rev its absolute nuts off to make quick progress. Interestingly, the same engine in the Brio feels much stronger thanks to the car’s significantly less kerb weight. As for the gearbox, the 5-speed manual is also a familiar unit and like before, is a treat to go through the gears. Going by the spike in demand for diesel cars, it’s the diesel-powered Jazz that, in all probability, will be Honda’s new big seller; powered by a 1.5-litre i-DTEC four cylinder motor, the diesel Jazz pushes out 100bhp of power and a meaty 200Nm of torque – familiar numbers for Amaze and City users. It’s the same unit which has received a lot of blow from the users for its harshness and keeping that in mind, Honda says it has invested in additional noise and vibration absorption techniques to reduce NVH levels. So has it worked? Yes, to an extent. However, it is still not as refined as say a diesel Hyundai Elite i20 and the diesel clatter is evident nearly all the time. Honda, though, fights back with a stronger midrange and a comparatively linear power delivery than most vehicles in its class including the VW Polo GT TDI and the Elite i20.

As far as fuel efficiency goes, Honda is claiming up to 27.3 kmpl for the diesel Jazz, making it one of the most fuel efficient hatchbacks on sale today. However, we couldn’t better 16kmpl during our stint with the car, although it was mainly down to our heavy right foot and the fact that our test route included a lot of negotiating through traffic. The impressive figure, no doubt, was aided by the smooth shifting 6-speed manual gearbox which uses a slightly different set of ratios compared to the City.

Honda Jazz Driving

The ride quality of Honda Jazz 2016 is good and is also an improvement over earlier Hondas. It does a good job of absorbing the bumps. The Michelin Energy Saving tyres help to increase the fuel efficiency of the Honda Jazz 2016, however, they aren’t that sticky on the road. The handling of the Jazz is good. This along with the peppiness of the diesel, is a great combination. The steering feedback is excellent and it weighs up well. This is indeed one of the much better electronic power steerings in the market.

Honda Jazz Safety

The front passengers are shielded with the presence of dual airbags. An anti-lock braking system (ABS) and electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD) are offered as well. Along with this, you also get a rear parking camera, front fog lamps, driver seatbelt reminder, rear windshield defogger and an immobiliser.

Honda Jazz Cost in Hyderabad

Honda Jazz Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 7,50,867/- (Jazz V MT Petrol) to 9,30,186/- (Jazz VX MT Diesel). Get best offers for Honda Jazz from Honda Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Jazz price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Honda Jazz Bottomline

We Indians are hatchback crazy. It’s no secret that we simply cannot get enough of their practicality, ease of use or the low running costs and a few other distinct advantages that they have over sedans or SUVs. Needless to say, carmakers are well-versed with this trend and have actively introduced new and improved products over the years. And although a similar movement is taking place in the flourishing compact crossover space, it’s the hatchbacks that continue to demand a lot of time and effort from established carmakers. Honda, for one, is making all the right noises with the Jazz. The new Jazz certainly looks the part, has a versatile cabin with loads of space and for the first time – the efficiency of a diesel motor. It’s still not an enthusiast’s choice but that’s passable because it’s not what Honda was looking to make here. The Jazz is all about practicality and you get plenty of it.

Honfa Brio Facelift Review & Test Drive

Honda Brio Overview

Honda was always in need to hit the small hatch segment and that was answered by the Brio. It was the small hatch of the small hatches. Small, usable, idea for the city and efficient and reliable thanks to Honda. The Brio came out in 2011 and was an instant hit. But as time passed so did the sales figures. Now in 2017 Honda has introduced the new Brio. What are the changes in the new Honda Brio 2017? Are there any additional features? We share our detailed review of the new Honda Brio 2017. For information on contact details of Honda car dealers in Bangalore

For price details on Honda Brio check CarzPrice

Honda Brio Style

The next generation Honda Brio will be based on the same platform the outgoing model is based on. The next generation of Brio will get a tweaked platform although. The modified platform will ensure rigidity and better safety. In terms of styling, the 2018 Honda Brio will come sporting a different looking compare to the outgoing model. The new generation Brio will sport aggressiveness and bit larger size. Expect the front fascia to come similar to the newly launched Honda Amaze facelift, sans the thick chrome grille.

The front grille receives a wider appearance with the Honda signature grille with the Honda logo at the centre. The headlamps sport a revamped touch as well. Expect the 2018 Honda Brio’s headlamps to come sleeker and with integrated LED daytime running lights. The lower fascia will get larger and bold looking air intake and large air dams at both sides housing the chrome highlighted fog lamp.

At the side profile, the car will sport redesigned alloy wheels, which will be available in the higher variants although. The lower variants will receive steel wheels. The wing mirrors with integrated side turning indicators. The shoulder line will be sharper and it will run upward toward the rear. The side profile would get crispy sharp character lines running upward. Moving toward the rear, the Brio might get a conventional frame instead of all glass appearance.

Honda Brio Space

The other reason for the roomy feel in the cabin is the amount of light that comes in from the large glass area. The steeply raked windscreen, the large front windows and the all-glass rear hatch gives the cabin an airy, well-lit feel, even on a cloudy day, as was the case during my test drive.

The other feature of the Brio’s interior that has enabled Honda to free up more space, especially knee-room, is thinner seat backs. By optimising the S-spring, Honda officials claim that thinner squabs were constructed without any compromise on the support provided to the passenger. The seats at the front are bucket-type with impact mitigating integrated headrests.

The dashboard layout also bears the Honda signature – simple, focused on practicality and uncluttered. The interior has a two-tone theme, but is dominated by light beige. The top half of the dash is grey, as is the centre console and steering wheel. Good fit and finish and quality plastic used gives the interior an upmarket feel which is free of compromises.

Triple analog 3D instrument meters, the trio of airconditioner controls on the centre stack and the exclusive 2-DIN audio system with USB and aux-in are noteworthy features. The chunky steering wheel fits neatly into ones hands and also offers audio system controls in the top-end variants. The glove box is narrow and a bit cramped, but there are a number of cubby holes to store all sorts of stuff on the go.

Honda Brio Transmission

On the mechanical bit, the Brio Automatic has a 4 cylinder 16 valve 1198cc engine which borrows the automatic transmission from its elder sibling sedan, the City. This unit produces a power of 88 PS at 6000 rpm and a torque of 109 Nm at 4500 rpm.

The manual version is my favorite. Its compact dimensions, awesome steering feedback and precise handling gives amazing confidence. In addition to that is the error less gear shifts. Since the torque is well distributed, the manual Brio does seem out of breath across the rpms. The i-Vtec is a wonderful engine and it does its job pretty well.

Of the 700 odd kms that I did in the Brio from Ahmedabad to Pune, there was no fatigue at all going to the extent of proving this is indeed a superb offering in its segment. On this trip itself, I had told the Honda team about my wish of a possibility of an automatic variant of the Brio which they politely declined to accept then only to send the invites of the automatic Brio drive later.

Inside the city with bumper to bumper traffic, the automatic gearbox is a blessing in disguise. Shift it to the drive mode and just forget about it. The automatic variant just vanishes the hassles of the often manual shifts in tight traffic. Since Brio weighs just 970 kgs, it offers superb handling.

The automatic earns its due appreciation inside the city however on the highways; there is a slight lag in the output. This lag is evident only while we overtake as the engine revs hard but then the vehicle doesn’t move in sync with it. Except for this, there are no big setbacks felt. Throw any surface and the Brio happily takes it on with a always smiling front face. The Honda Brio AT is on the lazier side of performance compared to its manual counterpart but then it will appeal to the commuter type. In city traffic one hardly gets time and space to test the acceleration of the car.

Honda Brio Driving

The Honda Brio is underpinned by a very potent platform in terms of dynamics. This is why currently Honda has four products based on the same platform including two 7-seaters. The Brio can handle triple digit speeds with good stability on the highways. The ride quality is flat most of the times and it doesn’t unsettle on bad roads. Since it is a light hatchback, the handling is brisk and the Honda Brio feels eager to take corners hard. The steering feels direct and very predictable while cornering. Braking performance is quite effective too having a strong pedal bite. There are no mechanical changes so you won’t feel any difference compared to the pre-facelift model.

Honda Brio Safety

The braking performance of the Brio is decent and on par with its rivals. The top version comes with ABS, further helping in the braking performance. The 175 mm-wide tyres also provide for a decent braking performance.

The front wheels have got ventilated disc brakes while the rear ones have drum brakes. The brakes do a good job in stopping this sprightly little hatch, thanks to the lightness of the car. The car has passive safety tech such as ABS (Anti-lock Braking System). The ABS system helps in case of sudden braking situations, and prevents the car from skidding and going out of control.

Honda Brio Price in Hyderabad

Honda Brio Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 4,71,981/- (Brio E MT Petrol) to 6,77,180/- (Brio VX AT Petrol). Get best offers for Honda Brio from Honda Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Brio price in Hydeabad at Carzprice

Honda Brio Bottomline

The Brio is said to be capable of delivering fuel efficiency of 18.4 kmpl, compared to the Jazz’s 16.7 kmpl. So, one key buyer need in the segment has been taken care of well. The cabin is roomy and fairly well insulated for a car in this segment. Suspension set up includes McPherson struts at the front and H-shape torsion beam at the rear. The ride is not the most pliant, but is fairly dynamic again for a car in this segment. The Brio is likely to be offered with four variants, with the top two variants featuring all the safety features like ABS, EBD and dual front airbags.