Maruti Suzuki Ertiga Facelift Review & First Drive

Maruti Suzuki Ertiga Overview

The compact utility vehicle segment was almost non-existent till the introduction of the Maruti Suzuki Ertiga in 2012. Unlike conventional UVs, the Ertiga felt, looked and drove like a car, which also became the recipe for its success. The carmaker called it the LUV (Life Utility Vehicle), an offering targeted at urban families looking for three rows in compact dimensions. Maruti Suzuki Ertiga On road price starts from 6,45,393/-. Check for price details of Maruti Suzuki Ertiga in CarzPrice.

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Maruti Suzuki Ertiga Exterior

The upgrades on the New Maruti Ertiga are not major. A new chrome front grille is introduced, which the company claims makes it look more premium. The new front grille does make the New Maruti Ertiga look different and refreshed. Chrome is what customers generally like. The new front bumper gets a chrome eye brow on the fog lamp. A new bumper also makes way here. The side profile of the New Maruti Ertiga remains unchanged. The rear gets a thick Ertiga embossed chrome lip. The alloy wheels are also new.

Maruti Suzuki Ertiga Interior

Entry to the cabin is made easy by large doors that open wide. The dashboard is a straight lift from the Swift, which means quality and ergonomics are good. Even the door pads and other plastics are of good quality, and the Ertiga doesn’t feel built to a price. There’s a long list of equipment too, which includes a CD player, Aux and USB ports, steering-mounted audio controls, powered mirrors and power windows. However, the more affordable VDi/VXi variants do without alloy wheels, fog lights and airbags. Visibility is decent from the front seats, which are taken from the Swift. They are broad with soft yet generous cushioning, which makes them truly comfortable even over long journeys. In the second row, the seat squab is a touch short, so under-thigh support is not as good as we would have liked. Other than that, it’s hard to fault. The high ‘hip point’, adjustable backrest, terrific headroom and decent legroom make the Ertiga’s middle bench a pretty comfortable place to be.

Move to the rear and it is clearly evident that the Ertiga can’t compete with the likes of the Xylo and Innova for sheer carpet area, but that said, the last row isn’t as uncomfortable as we thought. The narrow access means getting into the last row requires some contortion, and once you’re inside, shoulder room is tight and the squab is short.

The Ertiga’s best trick is the massive 240mm seat travel that allows you to deftly balance the legroom for both the second- and third-row passengers. Well-engineered latches and levers allow you to push forward or collapse the seats neatly into the floor. With all seven seats in place, there is enough space in the back to hold just two soft bags, while a concealed storage bay hidden beneath can hold small items. For more space, the third row can be folded flat. You also have the option to fold the middle row, and the 60:40 split further aids flexibility. Simply put, the cabin is far more useable than the Ertiga’s exterior dimensions would suggest.

Maruti Suzuki Ertiga Engine

The New Maruti Ertiga comes both in petrol and diesel. A CNG version is also available, which comes in only variant. The engines have good driveability. They are easy to drive in city and there isn’t much a need to shift gears that often. This makes it a lot easier to drive in the city. There is sufficient power in the engine to cruise on the highway.

The CNG variant comes only in the VXi variant. It isn’t very powerful and is more for economy. If you have a good amount of driving in the city, you might have to fill CNG even day. All the engines on the Maruti Ertiga facelift are refined and have low NVH. The diesel could have had a bit more power though. All the engines come with a five-speed manual transmission. The petrol even has an option of a four-speed automatic too

Maruti Suzuki Ertiga Driving

The Ertiga’s ride quality is nice and the suspension absorbs most potholes and craters with ease. The suspension set-up isn’t that soft and it does its job well. On the highways, the MPV remains very composed even at speeds up to 140 km/hr. The steering offers nice feedback but it just doesn’t weigh up at high speeds and continues to feel very light, which isn’t confidence-inspiring. The brake pedal lacks feel but braking performance is above average.

Maruti Suzuki Ertiga Safety

Servicing the Ertiga won’t be an issue because Maruti has a service centre in almost every nook and corner of India. Talking about safety, the Ertiga comes equipped with dual front airbags and ABS on almost every variant. The LXi and LDi variants miss out on these safety features but Maruti offers them on the LXi (O) and LDi (O) trims. Apart from that, all the other V and Z trims come with these features. The same goes for front seat belt pretensioners too. View offers on Maruti Cars from Maruti dealers inHyderabad at Autozhop

Maruti Suzuki Ertiga Price

Maruti Suzuki Ertiga Ex-Showroom Price in India ranges from 6,45,393/- (Ertiga LXI) to 10,60,506/- (Ertiga Smart Hybrid ZDI Plus). Get best offers for Maruti Suzuki Ertiga from Maruti Suzuki Dealers in India

Maruti Suzuki Ertiga Verdict

The Maruti Ertiga is a very good people’s carrier and it offers a good amount of features and practicality is also top notch. With the facelift, the car looks better, gets more equipment and even boasts of better efficiency. At the price it is offered for, the Ertiga does provide you with a lot of value and Maruti has got a strong contender on their hands in the 7-seater MPV segment.

Maruti Suzuki Baleno RS Engine & First Drive

Maruti Suzuki Baleno RS Overview

The race track is both the best and the worst place to test cars. Before you can begin to test a car on the tarmac, the track is already testing your ego. So, even if you get on to the track with a honed instinct to understand the car at hand, you have subliminally let that take a back seat by the time you are tackling the first corner. Often, it is a fight to keep the challenge going even as you weigh both your and the machine’s limitations. Maruti Suzuki Baleno RS On road price starts from 8,50,328/-. Check for price details of Maruti Suzuki Baleno RS in CarzPrice.

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That is exactly how it seemed when I was peering through the windscreen of the new Baleno Rs. I was at the Buddh International Circuit, the F1 circuit in Greater Noida just a few hours after the official launch of the Baleno Rs. Maruti Suzuki’s first honest attempt at a hot hatch is barely track ready, but the race track doesn’t discriminate. It is up to the driver to avoid getting distracted and focus on the task at hand. I was shaken out of that distraction when I was into my third lap. By that time it was already clear that the Baleno Rs. is not really meant for the track, but it was such good fun nonetheless.

Maruti Suzuki Baleno RS Exteriors & Interiors

The Baleno Rs. (Road Sport, not rally sport, according to Maruti) is the car market leader’s first attempt at creating what is closest to a hot hatch. In the Indian context, this belongs to the performance category, while elsewhere in the world, this is just one more engine variant of the Baleno; and in most cases meant to help meet more stringent emission norms. But, what is in a name… or should we say an appendage. The numbers should still excite petrol-heads. How does 102 hp of power and 150 Nm of torque sound to you? Not bad for a sub-one-litre engine in a sub-tonne hatch, right?

But, before we get carried away by the new Boosterjet engine and its prowess, let us get past the Baleno RS’s design identity. From a distance, the new sportier version of the Baleno could pass off as the existing model, except maybe from the rear and if you had a keen eye. Maruti Suzuki has chosen to keep the unique features on the RS’s exterior to a fair minimum. It has got a new bonnet grille with a grey metallic chrome surround and a new bumper at the front with what looks like a large airdam and aggressive profile. Faux skirts in the same grey metallic chrome finish run along the sides and under the front fender. The rear features a considerably altered fender compared to the regular Baleno’s. There is also the rear spoiler at the roof and the mid-tail gate chrome half spoiler with the reversing camera in the middle. The only place where the Rs. appendage is visible is at the rear with the badge in blue. The most unique and good looking feature of the new Rs. variant are the black alloy wheels.

The changes to the Baleno RS’s cabin are similarly minimal. The interior is offered in an all-black avatar, in keeping with a very sophisticated, European flavour. The touchscreen infotainment screen and the coloured multi-information display in the instrument cluster with the helpful power and torque delivery identified in a real-time circular chart format have both been carried forward from the current Baleno’s cabin. The RS’s cabin is otherwise identical and doesn’t sport any Rs. identifiers. But the Baleno’s cabin was already a good jump in fit and finish quality

Maruti Suzuki Baleno RS Performance

Under the hood, the Baleno RS gets a 1 litre, 3-cylinder, turbocharged petrol engine. Now since Maruti Suzuki has never done forced induction petrol engines in the past, the Baleno Boosterjet engine is completely new technology for it. The engine makes a substantial 101 bhp and 150 Nm. Despite being turbocharged, the max power and peak torque output is well spread out across the rev range and the engine almost feels like it is naturally aspirated, with very little turbo lag. Of course what everyone really wants to know is how the car’s outright performance is! And on that front too, the Baleno RS does not disappoint

Power delivery is very linear and the RS accelerates well on its way to three digit speeds. On the back straight at the BIC, we hit speeds of just over 160 kmph in fourth gear with the car still eager to accelerate more. Another point to note is that Maruti has not gone for an automatic gearbox like some of its competition and stuck to a 5-speed manual gearbox only. The gearbox isn’t as short and slick as that on the Swift but still feels very rewarding when shifting extremely quickly. Now if you are wondering why the Indian spec Baleno RS is almost 10 bhp down on power as compared to its global counterpart – blame it on the quality of fuel that our country has to offer. When BS VI fuel comes in, the Baleno RS will have the potential to match its international counterpart’s output at 110 bhp.

Baleno RS does get a slightly retuned suspension as compared to the standard car as it is slightly heavier. But a lower ride height and stiffer suspension setup should have been standard given the car’s sporty claim. That would have definitely differentiated the RS from its competition – and also more substantially from the regular Baleno too. So unfortunately the RS has a lot of body roll, especially when we took it to its limit on the track. The RS does get disc brakes all around – which is a good thing – 14 inch up front and 13 inch at the rear. As a result, the braking on the car has improved by leaps and bounds. On the safety side, ABS and two airbags come as standard – in keeping with Nexa portfolio products.

Maruti Suzuki Baleno RS Driving

On the track, the Baleno Rs. feels much quicker than the regular Baleno. There is no turbolag and power is delivered quick… well, for a hatch in the mass market segment. The comparison can’t be with real performance cars and that is also the reason why Maruti isn’t offering a 0 to 100 kmph time for the Baleno Rs. But, getting to three-digit speeds is quick and on the long back straight in the circuit, I could reach 160 kmph or thereabouts before having to brake hard to take the fourth turn. Speaking of braking, the Rs. gets discs on all four wheels, and the brakes offer decent bite and consistent stopping force. The steering is typical hatchback style with not much feedback, though, putting the Rs. on the desired spot on tarmac isn’t so much a problem. However, the stock tyres we drove on weren’t that helpful at high speed cornering; they squealed and slipped quite a bit after a few lap. View offers & discounts on Hyundai Cars from Hyundai dealers in India/Hyderabad at Autozhop

Maruti Suzuki Baleno RS Safety

The Baleno RS has been launched as a single variant (Alpha). It is equipped with dual airbags, seatbelts with pre-tensioners and force limiters, disc brakes in all wheels, ABS with EBD, and has ISOFIX child-seat restrain anchorages. Driver seatbelt reminder buzzer with lamp and rear parking sensors with camera are among the other safety features

Maruti Suzuki Baleno RS Cost

Maruti Suzuki Baleno Rs Ex-Showroom Price in India ranges from 8,50,328/- (Baleno RS 1.0L) to 8,50,328/- (Baleno RS 1.0L). Get best offers for Maruti Suzuki Baleno Rs from Maruti Suzuki Dealers in India

Maruti Suzuki Baleno RS Verdict

If you are looking for a quicker family hatchback, the Baleno RS won’t disappoint. With better acceleration, steering and brakes, the performance is an improvement over the standard petrol version. But this comes at a price. The Baleno RS commands a Rs 1.4 lakh premium over the standard petrol car and does not have any additional kit. Yes, along with the more powerful engine and rear disc brakes, you also get a stiffer chassis, improved steering and suspension. However, our sources tell us that all Balenos will get the stiffer chassis soon, anyway. That being the case, the Rs 1.4 lakh premium does seem like a lot. But performance has never come cheap. So, does the car do justice to its RS badge? Yes it’s quick, but out here on the F1 track it didn’t seem a quick hot hatch. Then again, this circuit has made many a sportscar look slow. Guess it’s time to put the Baleno back to back with the Abarth Punto and the Polo GT to find out.

Toyota Etios Liva Hatchback Test Drive & Gearbox

Toyota Etios Liva Overview

Toyota has launched the new dual-tone Etios Liva with two engine options and across a total of four variants. The dual-tone Etios Liva’s price starts at Rs 5.94 lakh (ex-showroom, Mumbai) and goes up to Rs 7.61 lakh (ex-showroom, Mumbai) for the top-end diesel variant. Toyota Etios Liva gets a sporty roof spoiler, new dual-tone painted contrast roof and pillars, black finish on the front grille, chrome fog lamp bezels, electrically-foldable ORVMs, and diamond cut alloy wheels. Inside, it receives a piano black finish instrument panel, optitron combimeter rear removable headrests, adjustable front headrest, and 3D textured seat fabric. For information on contact details of Toyota car dealers in Pune

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The new generation Dual-Tone Etios Liva is a whole package with the best in class safety features, fuel efficiency, space, stylish looks, quality and performance. It sets a benchmark in safety with standardized dual air bags and Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) with Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD) across all grades which is the first in the industry. New ISOFIX child seat locks for all models and all grades has been added to ensure safety of children. We are confident that Indian customers will appreciate the most trendiest hatchback in town

Toyota Etios Liva Style

With an aerodynamic body structure and modified features, its exteriors look quite attractive. Its side profile is defined by visible character lines. The door handles and outside rear view mirrors (integrated with side turn blinker) are painted in body color. Its flared up wheel arches are fitted with a set of 14-inch steel wheels, which have full wheel covers and are covered with 175/70 R14 sized tubeless tyres . The front fascia is designed with a well designed radiator grille with grey finish and it is embedded with a prominent chrome plated company’s insignia. This grille is flanked by a radiant headlight cluster that is integrated with high intensity halogen lamps and side turn indicator. Its body colored bumper has a wide air intake section for cooling the engine. The windscreen is made of green tinted glass and is integrated with a pair of intermittent wipers. The rear end is elegantly designed with stylish tail light cluster, body colored bumper with a pair of reflectors and an expressive boot lid, which is embossed with variant badging. The windshield is integrated with a high mounted stop lamp that adds to the safety aspect. This hatchback is designed with an overall length of 3775mm, a total width of 1695mm and a decent height of 1510mm. It has a large wheelbase of 2465mm and a minimum ground clearance of 170mm.

Toyota Etios Liva Comfort

With the exteriors done and dusted, let’s check what the Etios Liva has to offer once you step inside the cabin. In all honestly, there is not much. You continue to get the same simplistic and basic cabin layout, which is a bit of a turn-off as there was indeed quite a lot of scope for improvement.

First its the steering wheel, which ergonomically feels a bit to large to handle; however it does get mounted controls for the 2-din music system. Talking about the music system, this piece in itself feels outdated, especially if you were to compare it with the ones available on the competition. The dial for operating the air-con control module are very basic while the ones for door locks, exterior mirror adjustment and headlamp leveling feel a bit awkwardly placed.

With the update, Toyota has now revamped the centrally mounted instrument cluster and now it gets a digital tachometer, in addition to the back-lit speedometer, which now looks significantly better than the earlier one. Ergonomically, the Etios Liva’s cabin offers decent storage space, comfortable seats with good shoulder and under thigh support. To sum it up, the interiors of the Etios Liva are a love it or hate it affair, they have been designed not to look good but to work well, which they will for sure.

Toyota Etios Liva Engine

There was a lot of talk of the Toyota Etios Liva getting the big 1.5-litre engine from the sedan, but anyone who knows the Indian market would know that the hatch would be looking to exploit the maximum benefits of the excise duty concessions that the Indian government has on offer for small cars. That means that under the Etios Liva hood is a 1.2-litre four-cylinder engine (Read :Engine & Transmission). On paper, it isn’t all that bad, 80PS @ 5600rpm and 104Nm @ 3100rpm. In fact the figures are pretty close to most of the competition and better than some as well. Coupled with the Liva’s approximately 900 kg kerb weight, it should also make for a great power-to-weight ratio to score high on performance. But somehow, that’s not the case because the Etios LIVA’s brief seems to be rather straight forward – better efficiency. With the gear ratios matched to make life in the city easier, the car does feel peppy enough at low revs and accelerates cleanly off the line, but the excitement tapers off much too soon and you really need to work the engine to get past 120km/h.

Our instrumented tests did see the car cross the 150km/h mark but it took a lot of patience and even more stretches of empty roads to get there. The 5-speed manual gearbox may be the culprit here with gear ratios more conducive for city driving rather than highway cruising. But that does have a rather positive effect on its fuel efficiency. The ARAI certified stat reads 18.3kmpl cumulative but real world conditions should see you get about 14.3kmpl in the city and 16.1kmpl on the highway. Considering the prices of petrol today, that’s a welcome proposition indeed! All through the test, the Liva’s gearbox provided positive feel and slick shifts all the way to fifth. Predictably, the Liva didn’t scorch the acceleration runs, taking over 17 seconds to cross the 100km/h mark.

Toyota Etios Liva Rideing

What impresses most is the steering. We realized a turning circle radius of 4.8M, which means taking the car out from narrow spaces will never be a problem. Changing gears is very smooth and one can easily change gears while driving. The car’s ride is very smooth and comfortable. The Toyota Etios Liva’s AC is good and powerful and one could feel the effectiveness of the same quickly after turning it on. One more point here is that the glove box is also provided with blower inputs and hence cooling takes place in glove box, making it a good storage for things like chocolates, cool drink bottles etc. Also cup holders have been provided in each door and near the dash which adds to comfort as expected from a premium hatch.

Major humps in the road are overcome with comfort thanks to the high quality suspension. There was no discomfort after the front wheels crossed hump, and there was enough ground clearance to clear the humps without scraping the ground.The car’s pick up is good and we could reach 60 to 80KMPH easily and smoothly in city traffic. While we pushed the car, we were able to touch 150 on the highways. The positioning of Instrument cluster in the middle though innovative, makes it difficult to gauge the speed of the car.Parking of the Etios Liva was easy and we could confidently park the car with minimum space for turning the car.

Toyota Etios Liva Safety

Toyota has taken care of the safety of the passengers inside and a s a result they actually have loaded the LIva hatchback with ABS and EBD which comes as standard across all its grades. Furthermore the hatch also gets duel front SRS airbags as well. There is also an optional rear parking sensors as well with the car.

Toyota Etios Liva Cost in Hyderabad

Toyota Etios Liva Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 5,49,973/- (Etios Liva G) to 7,43,215/- (Etios Liva VXD Dual Tone). Get best offers for Toyota Etios Liva from Toyota Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Etios Liva price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Toyota Etios Liva Bottomline

Let us get this straight, making affordable cars in India is a tough task and so far Maruti Suzuki and Hyundai have been successful. The Etios Liva is a good hatchback to buy and for the price you can expect a little better quality. However, the interior styling could have been better. The biggest USP of this hatchback is the Toyota badge and bullet proof reliability of this Japanese manufacturer. The top-of-the-line variant of the Liva diesel costs about Rs 8 lakhs, there are cars with more features available at this price, but most of them lack the refinement and experience of that Toyota promises. You can’t expect the same high Lindt standards for that price, which the Swiss company has set with its other range of chocolates. However, the company will deliver better product than a Cadbury and so is Toyota. They have made a lot of changes in the Etios family, we expect them to sort out the remaining ones too.

Honda Jazz Engine & Test Drive

Honda Jazz Overview

Premium hatchbacks have defied the general consensus of bigger is better, a rare reality in the size conscious Indian car market. Honda was first to bring in a premium hatchback with the second gen Jazz last decade, the vehicle being the most expensive hatchback at that time. A facelift and a massive price correction did no wonders and the Jazz continued to do rather poorly on the sales chart, leading to its ultimate discontinuation. Honda India pulled the plug on the Jazz a couple of years back so it could focus on mass market products like the Amaze and now with the compact sedan doing well, the big Honda hatch is making a return. The Jazz is a very successful product for Honda, the company having sold more than 5.5 million units across 75 countries, with 11 countries producing the vehicle. So why should we sit up and take notice? Because in its last outing, the Jazz did not have a diesel mill, it was also lower on local content but this time around, the Earth Dreams oil burner finds its way to the Jazz (India is the sole country in the world were a diesel Jazz exists as Europe doesn’t get it and no diesel Jazz exports will be done by Honda India) and the vehicle has more than 90% localisation!  For information on contact details of Honda car dealers in Kolkata

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Honda Jazz Look

The Honda Jazz 2016 is based on the new Honda City and is 55mm longer than the previous generation. Honda internally calls this design as Crossfade Monoform design. The fascia of the Honda Jazz 2016 resembles the Honda City. It has a similar front grille, though it doesn’t get the chrome finish. Honda is targeting the Honda Jazz 2016 for the youth or those you prefer trendy styling over subtle. The headlamps are single barrel and the front bumpers are different from the City.

The side profile of the Honda Jazz 2016 is a lot similar to the previous generation as it still retains the same design philosophy like the quarter glass panel, blacked out pillars and the large glass-in area. The tail lamps and rear styling too remind you of the previous Jazz, but it does look fresh with LED tail lamps.

Honda Jazz Space

Open the large doors and an all black theme welcomes you. They do instill a sense of Deja Vu as the cabin borrows heavily from the Honda City. The centre console sits at the focus, and it comes with a very neat assortment of buttons and switches. The piano black finish for the entire console brings a premium aura to the entire cabin. We’re sure that you’ll love the 6.2-inch touch screen that is incorporated into the console, and a noteworthy point is that it comes along with DVD playback, navigation and can play music from a host of inputs.

Arranged right beneath this is a feather-touch climate control screen, with controls spread out right underneath it. While it does look cool and futuristic, operating it on the go is a bit of a bother. While we have no complaints on the performance of the air-conditioning, we have to point out that the fan is awfully loud.Integrated into the centre console, in front of the gear-knob are two cup holders. Three more storage slots have been put in place of the armrest, and this may go as a strong bonus for some, and a slash in comfort for others.

The steering wheel is just the right size and feels good to hold. However, it skips out on telescopic adjustment (VW Polo has it). The wheel is shared with the Honda City. The difference, notably, is the lack of cruise control buttons. The basic audio controls have been incorporated into the left, while the telephone buttons are placed behind the wheel.As for the instrument cluster, the dials lack the illuminated blue rings that you’d find in the City. The three-pod instrument cluster house the tachometer, speedometer and a multi-information display (MID). The MID reads out trip details and average fuel efficiency. The pod also houses an instantaneous FE meter, a readout for the outside temperature and the fuel gauge.

There is decent amount of bolstering for lateral support. Even people with heftier builds will have little reason to complain here. Cushioning is adequate and the seat also gets height adjustment. Getting into a comfortable driving position is not a big task, although a telescopic adjust on the steering wheel would have made it much easier. The rear bench is amongst the most spacious in its segment. Sitting three abreast is possible. Knee room and headroom are amongst the best in its class. A noteworthy feature is that the rear bench can recline by a couple of degrees to the back. For someone who dislikes the upright seating posture, the reclined posture keeps the lower back a lot happier.The Jazz also gets something Honda chooses to call ‘Magic Seats’. The rear bench can be folded in multiple combinations, enabling the user to tailor space according to his/her needs. A segment exclusive feature, which is sadly restricted to the top-variants.

Honda Jazz Gearbox

Under the stubby hood of the Jazz one can find either the popular 1.2-litre i-VTEC petrol or the relatively new 1.5-litre i-DTEC diesel motor. While the former is available with either a 5-speed manual or a CVT automatic, the diesel car gets a 6-speed manual similar to that of the new City. Starting with the petrol motor, this 1.2-litre unit is a familiar unit, previously seen in a range of Honda models including the Brio, the Amaze and even the old Jazz. Known for its refined nature and strong mid-range grunt, it produces 90bhp of power and 110Nm of torque, and in the new Jazz it retains those characteristics. During our stint behind the wheel, the petrol-powered Jazz felt fairly satisfying (if not thrilling) to drive, although I was bound to rev its absolute nuts off to make quick progress. Interestingly, the same engine in the Brio feels much stronger thanks to the car’s significantly less kerb weight. As for the gearbox, the 5-speed manual is also a familiar unit and like before, is a treat to go through the gears. Going by the spike in demand for diesel cars, it’s the diesel-powered Jazz that, in all probability, will be Honda’s new big seller; powered by a 1.5-litre i-DTEC four cylinder motor, the diesel Jazz pushes out 100bhp of power and a meaty 200Nm of torque – familiar numbers for Amaze and City users. It’s the same unit which has received a lot of blow from the users for its harshness and keeping that in mind, Honda says it has invested in additional noise and vibration absorption techniques to reduce NVH levels. So has it worked? Yes, to an extent. However, it is still not as refined as say a diesel Hyundai Elite i20 and the diesel clatter is evident nearly all the time. Honda, though, fights back with a stronger midrange and a comparatively linear power delivery than most vehicles in its class including the VW Polo GT TDI and the Elite i20.

As far as fuel efficiency goes, Honda is claiming up to 27.3 kmpl for the diesel Jazz, making it one of the most fuel efficient hatchbacks on sale today. However, we couldn’t better 16kmpl during our stint with the car, although it was mainly down to our heavy right foot and the fact that our test route included a lot of negotiating through traffic. The impressive figure, no doubt, was aided by the smooth shifting 6-speed manual gearbox which uses a slightly different set of ratios compared to the City.

Honda Jazz Driving

The ride quality of Honda Jazz 2016 is good and is also an improvement over earlier Hondas. It does a good job of absorbing the bumps. The Michelin Energy Saving tyres help to increase the fuel efficiency of the Honda Jazz 2016, however, they aren’t that sticky on the road. The handling of the Jazz is good. This along with the peppiness of the diesel, is a great combination. The steering feedback is excellent and it weighs up well. This is indeed one of the much better electronic power steerings in the market.

Honda Jazz Safety

The front passengers are shielded with the presence of dual airbags. An anti-lock braking system (ABS) and electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD) are offered as well. Along with this, you also get a rear parking camera, front fog lamps, driver seatbelt reminder, rear windshield defogger and an immobiliser.

Honda Jazz Cost in Hyderabad

Honda Jazz Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 7,50,867/- (Jazz V MT Petrol) to 9,30,186/- (Jazz VX MT Diesel). Get best offers for Honda Jazz from Honda Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Jazz price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Honda Jazz Bottomline

We Indians are hatchback crazy. It’s no secret that we simply cannot get enough of their practicality, ease of use or the low running costs and a few other distinct advantages that they have over sedans or SUVs. Needless to say, carmakers are well-versed with this trend and have actively introduced new and improved products over the years. And although a similar movement is taking place in the flourishing compact crossover space, it’s the hatchbacks that continue to demand a lot of time and effort from established carmakers. Honda, for one, is making all the right noises with the Jazz. The new Jazz certainly looks the part, has a versatile cabin with loads of space and for the first time – the efficiency of a diesel motor. It’s still not an enthusiast’s choice but that’s passable because it’s not what Honda was looking to make here. The Jazz is all about practicality and you get plenty of it.

React’s Five Fingers of Death. Master these five concepts, then master React.

A few years ago, my friend Sean started telling me how this brand new front-end library called React was going to take over the web. At first I dismissed it as just another framework fad. But then I started hearing about React more and more, to the point where I felt like ignoring it just wasn’t an option anymore.

Maybe you’re in the same position I was in: you’ve been hearing about React left and right, but actually sitting down and learning it feels like such a chore.

The good news is that you can boil everything you need to know about React down to five key concepts.

Now don’t get me wrong, this doesn’t mean I can turn you into a React master instantly. But at least you’ll understand all the major concepts, if you do decide to jump in.

The five key concepts are:

  1. Components
  2. JSX
  3. Props & State
  4. The Component API
  5. Component Types

Before we get started, note that I originally learned React through Wes Bos’s courses, and have included a few affiliate links to them. Whenever possible, I’ve also included links to free resources.

Oh, and my friend Sean? He’s since moved on to much more cutting-edge-ier things. After all, React is so 2015.

Concept #1: How React components work

The first thing you need to know about React is that it’s all about components. Your React codebase is basically just one large pile of big components that call smaller components.

But what’s a component, you ask? A perfect example of a component is the common <select> HTML element. Not only does it come with its own visual output (the grey box, text label, and downward arrow that make up the element itself) — it also handles its own opening and closing logic.

The classic <select>

Now imagine being able to build your own self-contained custom <select>, with its own style and behavior:

A fancier version of the good old <select>

Well, that’s exactly what React lets you do. A React component is a single object that not only outputs HTML like a traditional template would, but also includes all the code needed to control that output. For Web designing services check Vivid Designs

In practice, the most common way to write React components is as an ES6 class containing a render method that returns HTML. (There’s also a super-secret functional way, but you’ll have to wait until concept #4 to learn about it):

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>Hello World!<p>;
  }
}

Concept #2: How JSX works

As you can see, the component approach means that both HTML and JavaScript code live in the same file. React’s secret weapon to achieve this unholy alliance is the JSX language (where “X” stands for “XML”).

JSX might seem awkward at first, but you get used to it pretty fast.

Yes, I know. We’ve all been taught to maintain a strong separation between HTML and JavaScript. But it turns out that relaxing these rules a bit can actually do wonders for your front-end productivity.

For example, since you now have the full power of JavaScript at your disposal, here’s how you can display the current date by inserting a snippet of JavaScript in your HTML using {...}:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>Today is: {new Date()}</p>;
  }
}

This also means that you’ll use plain JavaScript for if statements or loops, rather than some kind of template-specific syntax. JavaScript’s ternary operator comes in especially handy here:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>Hello {this.props.someVar ?  'World' : 'Kitty'}</p>;
  }
}

And by the way, if you need to brush up on the newest points of JavaScript syntax, I recommend ES6 for Everyone by Wes Bos (if you like videos) or Practical ES6 by Nicolas Bevacqua (if you prefer reading).

Concept #3: How Props & State work

Maybe you’ve been wondering where the this.props.someVar variable above is coming from.

If you’ve ever written a line of HTML, you’re probably familiar with HTML attributes like the <a> tag’s href. In React, attributes are known as props(short for “properties”). Props are how components talk to each other.

class ParentComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <ChildComponent message="Hello World"/>;
  }
}
class ChildComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>And then I said, “{this.props.message}”</p>;
  }
}

Because of this, React’s data flow is unidirectional: data can only go from parent components to their children, not the other way around.

Sometimes though, a component needs to react to data that doesn’t come from a parent component (such as user input for example). And this is where the state comes in.

A good metaphor to understand the difference between props and state would be the Etch-A-Sketch. Unlike things like the body color and dial position of the Etch-A-Sketch tablet (props), the drawing itself (state) is not an inherent property of the Etch-A-Sketch. It’s just the temporary result of user input.

Note that a component’s state can also be passed on to its own children as a prop. You can think of this as a big river flowing downhill, with the router, data layer, and various components each adding their own little stream of data to form the main app state.

Inside a component, state is managed using the setState function, which is often called inside an event handler:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  handleClick = (e) => {
    this.setState({clicked: true});
  }
  render() {
    return <a href="#" onClick={this.handleClick}>Click me</a>;
  }
}

In practice, the vast majority of data in a React app will be a prop. It’s only when you need to accept user input that you’ll use state to handle the change.

Note that we’re using a fat arrow here to take care of binding the handleClickhandler. You can learn more about this technique here.

Concept #4: How the Component API works

We’ve already mentioned render and setState, which are both part of a small set of component API methods. Another useful one is the constructor, which you can use to initialize your state and bind methods.

Apart from these three functions, React also provides a set of callbacks triggered at various points during the component’s lifecycle (before loading, after loading, after unmounting, and so on). Unless you’re doing some advanced React voodoo, you’ll probably almost never need to worry about these.

If this section seems short, it’s because learning React is actually much more about mastering programming and architectural concepts rather than learning a set of boring API methods. This is what makes it so refreshing!

Concept #5: How Component Types work

We’ve seen how to use classes to define a component:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>Hello World!<p>;
  }
}

And we’ve also talked about the component methods supported by these classes. Now forget all about them! More and more, people are writing React components as functional components.

A functional component is a function that takes a props object as argument, and returns a bunch of HTML. Almost like a traditional template, with the key difference that you can still use whatever JavaScript code you need inside that function:

const myComponent = props => {
  return <p>Hello {props.name}! Today is {new Date()}.</p>
}

The consequence of using the functional component syntax is that you lose access to the component methods we just talked about. But it turns out that in practice that’s perfectly fine, since the vast majority of your components probably won’t need them. Web development company in Hyderabad visit Vivid Designs 

By the way, one of these methods is setState, and this means functional components cannot have state. For that reason they’re often referred to as stateless functional components.

Since functional components require much less boilerplate code, it makes sense to use them whenever possible. For this reason, most React apps contain a healthy mix of both syntaxes.

Note that there’s also a third, legacy syntax using the createClass function. But anybody using it should be shamed and called names for daring to still be using coding patterns from 18 months ago:

var Greeting = React.createClass({ 
  
  render: function() {     
    return <h1>Hello, {this.props.name}</h1>;   
  }
});

Concept #6: How Component Roles work

OK, I lied. There are actually six things, not five. But what can I say, the movie isn’t called “Six Fingers Of Death.” Although now that I think about it, that sounds like it’d be a pretty cool movie, probably involving some kind of alien kung-fu master seeking revenge.

But back to the topic at hand. Now come the boring architectural concepts I was talking about. So if none of this makes sense feel free to come back once you’ve had a chance to play with React some more.

After using React for a while, people started seeing two distinct “flavors” of code appear in their components: one flavor was concerned with UI logic such as showing and hiding thing. And the other was all about data logic, such as loading data from your server.

This led to the distinction between container and presentationalcomponents (also sometimes known as “smart” and “dumb” components). Container components should handle your data, but — and this is the important part — not your UI. Presentational components are just the opposite.

Google image result for “smart component”. I have no clue what this is. Image credit

In other words, in the classic to-do list example, one component will load the data, and then pass that data on to a different component that will be in charge of outputting the actual HTML markup and handling local state changes.

This is very similar to the view/controller pattern you might be familiar with from your back-end developer days. (’member Rails? ’member Django?)

The container/presentational distinction was popularized in this blog post by Dan Abramov (the creator of Redux), and I recommend checking it out if you want to dig deeper.

Higher-Order Components

Before we wrap things up, we should talk a bit about a type of container components known as higher-order components (often shortened as HoCs).

A HoC is a component that you can wrap around another component to pass it special props, and it’s typically created using a higher-order component factory function. Note that people commonly refer to the function itself as a “HoC”, which might not be 100% correct technically, but isn’t a big deal in practice.

As an example, calling React Router’s withRouter factory function on <MyComponent>will wrap it in a new<withRouter(MyComponent)/> component that passes the Router prop to the afore-mentioned <MyComponent>.

You can think of a HoC function as a golf caddie that follows their golfer around and hands them the club they need it. By themselves, the caddie can’t actually do anything with the golf clubs. They’re just there to give the golfer access to more tools.

HoCs are a very powerful concept. For example, the Recompose library even lets you handle state changes through HoCs. In other words, you can now manage state without having to involve any ES6 class-based components.

With HoC composition becoming so common, it seems like React might be moving away from the ES6 class syntax and more towards a purely functional approach. Interesting times!

Recap

So let’s recap what we’ve just learned:

  • A React codebase is made up of components.
  • These components are written using JSX.
  • Data flows from parent to children, except when it comes to state, which originates inside a component.
  • Components possess a small set of lifecycle and utility methods.
  • Components can also be written as pure functions.
  • You should keep data logic and UI logic in separate components.
  • Higher-order components are a common pattern for giving a component access to new tools.

Believe it or not, we’ve just covered 90% of the knowledge used by a React developer on a daily basis. No matter how abstract or obscure the pattern, everything in React can always be boiled down to functions and props.

Once you truly understand this, React will stop being scary. You’ll be able to see patterns in the code, understand new codebases at a glance, and only then will you be able to proudly proclaim:

“Pfff! React is so 2015!”

Going Further

If I’ve managed to convince you that React isn’t so bad, you might want to take a stab at learning it properly. If so, I can’t recommend the React for Beginnersvideo course enough. It’s how I learned React myself, and it’s actually just been updated to cover all the cool new stuff like functional stateless components:

If you don’t want your hard-earned dollars to finance the nefarious React lobby (I heard Dan Abramov is onto his third yacht), you can also learn for free by checking out this huge list of React resources.

And if you need to put all this newly-acquired knowledge in practice by contributing to a cool React open-source project, check out Telescope Nova. It’s the easiest way to quickly create a full-stack React + GraphQL app, complete with user accounts, forms, and data loading out of the box. And did I mention we’re looking for contributors?

Finally, if you’ve enjoyed this article, please share it and recommend it (that little green heart just below). And please let me know on Twitter what you’d like me to write about next!

Source

Get a ‘Portable’ Virtual Phone Number For Your Small Business

In the past, clients and consumers were wary of businesses operating from their homes. Knowing this, many home business owners sought ways, many of which were expensive, to hide the fact they worked home. They’d obtain a box at a local mail store and hire an answering service. Today, home based businesses are normal and only a few clients or consumers question it. Further, the options to create a professional identity, have become more affordable. Check for Virtual Phone Number For Your Small Business in Linkedphone

For a small business, virtual PBX services are a godsend. They provide a small business with all of the bells and whistles of a robust, business-class phone system for as low as $10/ month.They work with your existing phone lines; they have cool apps that make them easy to manage; they make it possible for your whole team to be contacted through one number; and they are easy to scale. There is one catch that you should be aware of: the number you are assigned through a virtual PBX service may not be “portable.”

What does it mean for a number to not be portable? It means that you can’t take the number with you if you decide to change services. Unlike cell phone services, residential and business VoIP phone services, and traditional landline companies, virtual PBX services are not required by the FTC to let you take your number with you (unless it’s an 800 number) to another service.

There are two solutions to this problem:

1 Sign up with a virtual PBX provider that allows you to port your number out. (RingCentral Mobile is a high quality service that we have verified does allow this.)

2 Sign up with whichever virtual PBX provider you prefer that doesn’t charge for porting a number into the service and verify that you like the service. (Most don’t, but you can double check that the one you like doesn’t by looking at the “Numbers” section of our Detailed Reviews grid, such as this one for Phone.com.) Then, sign up with a low cost phone service provider that doesn’t require a long term contract (like a residential VoIP provider). Port your number from the low cost phone service provider to the virtual PBX service and then cancel the phone service.

The first method is the easiest and the cheapest. The second method is significantly more complicated, but it will ensure that the number is legally yours according to the FTC.