Toyota Etios Liva Hatchback Test Drive & Gearbox

Toyota Etios Liva Overview

Toyota has launched the new dual-tone Etios Liva with two engine options and across a total of four variants. The dual-tone Etios Liva’s price starts at Rs 5.94 lakh (ex-showroom, Mumbai) and goes up to Rs 7.61 lakh (ex-showroom, Mumbai) for the top-end diesel variant. Toyota Etios Liva gets a sporty roof spoiler, new dual-tone painted contrast roof and pillars, black finish on the front grille, chrome fog lamp bezels, electrically-foldable ORVMs, and diamond cut alloy wheels. Inside, it receives a piano black finish instrument panel, optitron combimeter rear removable headrests, adjustable front headrest, and 3D textured seat fabric. For information on contact details of Toyota car dealers in Pune

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The new generation Dual-Tone Etios Liva is a whole package with the best in class safety features, fuel efficiency, space, stylish looks, quality and performance. It sets a benchmark in safety with standardized dual air bags and Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) with Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD) across all grades which is the first in the industry. New ISOFIX child seat locks for all models and all grades has been added to ensure safety of children. We are confident that Indian customers will appreciate the most trendiest hatchback in town

Toyota Etios Liva Style

With an aerodynamic body structure and modified features, its exteriors look quite attractive. Its side profile is defined by visible character lines. The door handles and outside rear view mirrors (integrated with side turn blinker) are painted in body color. Its flared up wheel arches are fitted with a set of 14-inch steel wheels, which have full wheel covers and are covered with 175/70 R14 sized tubeless tyres . The front fascia is designed with a well designed radiator grille with grey finish and it is embedded with a prominent chrome plated company’s insignia. This grille is flanked by a radiant headlight cluster that is integrated with high intensity halogen lamps and side turn indicator. Its body colored bumper has a wide air intake section for cooling the engine. The windscreen is made of green tinted glass and is integrated with a pair of intermittent wipers. The rear end is elegantly designed with stylish tail light cluster, body colored bumper with a pair of reflectors and an expressive boot lid, which is embossed with variant badging. The windshield is integrated with a high mounted stop lamp that adds to the safety aspect. This hatchback is designed with an overall length of 3775mm, a total width of 1695mm and a decent height of 1510mm. It has a large wheelbase of 2465mm and a minimum ground clearance of 170mm.

Toyota Etios Liva Comfort

With the exteriors done and dusted, let’s check what the Etios Liva has to offer once you step inside the cabin. In all honestly, there is not much. You continue to get the same simplistic and basic cabin layout, which is a bit of a turn-off as there was indeed quite a lot of scope for improvement.

First its the steering wheel, which ergonomically feels a bit to large to handle; however it does get mounted controls for the 2-din music system. Talking about the music system, this piece in itself feels outdated, especially if you were to compare it with the ones available on the competition. The dial for operating the air-con control module are very basic while the ones for door locks, exterior mirror adjustment and headlamp leveling feel a bit awkwardly placed.

With the update, Toyota has now revamped the centrally mounted instrument cluster and now it gets a digital tachometer, in addition to the back-lit speedometer, which now looks significantly better than the earlier one. Ergonomically, the Etios Liva’s cabin offers decent storage space, comfortable seats with good shoulder and under thigh support. To sum it up, the interiors of the Etios Liva are a love it or hate it affair, they have been designed not to look good but to work well, which they will for sure.

Toyota Etios Liva Engine

There was a lot of talk of the Toyota Etios Liva getting the big 1.5-litre engine from the sedan, but anyone who knows the Indian market would know that the hatch would be looking to exploit the maximum benefits of the excise duty concessions that the Indian government has on offer for small cars. That means that under the Etios Liva hood is a 1.2-litre four-cylinder engine (Read :Engine & Transmission). On paper, it isn’t all that bad, 80PS @ 5600rpm and 104Nm @ 3100rpm. In fact the figures are pretty close to most of the competition and better than some as well. Coupled with the Liva’s approximately 900 kg kerb weight, it should also make for a great power-to-weight ratio to score high on performance. But somehow, that’s not the case because the Etios LIVA’s brief seems to be rather straight forward – better efficiency. With the gear ratios matched to make life in the city easier, the car does feel peppy enough at low revs and accelerates cleanly off the line, but the excitement tapers off much too soon and you really need to work the engine to get past 120km/h.

Our instrumented tests did see the car cross the 150km/h mark but it took a lot of patience and even more stretches of empty roads to get there. The 5-speed manual gearbox may be the culprit here with gear ratios more conducive for city driving rather than highway cruising. But that does have a rather positive effect on its fuel efficiency. The ARAI certified stat reads 18.3kmpl cumulative but real world conditions should see you get about 14.3kmpl in the city and 16.1kmpl on the highway. Considering the prices of petrol today, that’s a welcome proposition indeed! All through the test, the Liva’s gearbox provided positive feel and slick shifts all the way to fifth. Predictably, the Liva didn’t scorch the acceleration runs, taking over 17 seconds to cross the 100km/h mark.

Toyota Etios Liva Rideing

What impresses most is the steering. We realized a turning circle radius of 4.8M, which means taking the car out from narrow spaces will never be a problem. Changing gears is very smooth and one can easily change gears while driving. The car’s ride is very smooth and comfortable. The Toyota Etios Liva’s AC is good and powerful and one could feel the effectiveness of the same quickly after turning it on. One more point here is that the glove box is also provided with blower inputs and hence cooling takes place in glove box, making it a good storage for things like chocolates, cool drink bottles etc. Also cup holders have been provided in each door and near the dash which adds to comfort as expected from a premium hatch.

Major humps in the road are overcome with comfort thanks to the high quality suspension. There was no discomfort after the front wheels crossed hump, and there was enough ground clearance to clear the humps without scraping the ground.The car’s pick up is good and we could reach 60 to 80KMPH easily and smoothly in city traffic. While we pushed the car, we were able to touch 150 on the highways. The positioning of Instrument cluster in the middle though innovative, makes it difficult to gauge the speed of the car.Parking of the Etios Liva was easy and we could confidently park the car with minimum space for turning the car.

Toyota Etios Liva Safety

Toyota has taken care of the safety of the passengers inside and a s a result they actually have loaded the LIva hatchback with ABS and EBD which comes as standard across all its grades. Furthermore the hatch also gets duel front SRS airbags as well. There is also an optional rear parking sensors as well with the car.

Toyota Etios Liva Cost in Hyderabad

Toyota Etios Liva Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 5,49,973/- (Etios Liva G) to 7,43,215/- (Etios Liva VXD Dual Tone). Get best offers for Toyota Etios Liva from Toyota Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Etios Liva price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Toyota Etios Liva Bottomline

Let us get this straight, making affordable cars in India is a tough task and so far Maruti Suzuki and Hyundai have been successful. The Etios Liva is a good hatchback to buy and for the price you can expect a little better quality. However, the interior styling could have been better. The biggest USP of this hatchback is the Toyota badge and bullet proof reliability of this Japanese manufacturer. The top-of-the-line variant of the Liva diesel costs about Rs 8 lakhs, there are cars with more features available at this price, but most of them lack the refinement and experience of that Toyota promises. You can’t expect the same high Lindt standards for that price, which the Swiss company has set with its other range of chocolates. However, the company will deliver better product than a Cadbury and so is Toyota. They have made a lot of changes in the Etios family, we expect them to sort out the remaining ones too.

Honda Jazz Engine & Test Drive

Honda Jazz Overview

Premium hatchbacks have defied the general consensus of bigger is better, a rare reality in the size conscious Indian car market. Honda was first to bring in a premium hatchback with the second gen Jazz last decade, the vehicle being the most expensive hatchback at that time. A facelift and a massive price correction did no wonders and the Jazz continued to do rather poorly on the sales chart, leading to its ultimate discontinuation. Honda India pulled the plug on the Jazz a couple of years back so it could focus on mass market products like the Amaze and now with the compact sedan doing well, the big Honda hatch is making a return. The Jazz is a very successful product for Honda, the company having sold more than 5.5 million units across 75 countries, with 11 countries producing the vehicle. So why should we sit up and take notice? Because in its last outing, the Jazz did not have a diesel mill, it was also lower on local content but this time around, the Earth Dreams oil burner finds its way to the Jazz (India is the sole country in the world were a diesel Jazz exists as Europe doesn’t get it and no diesel Jazz exports will be done by Honda India) and the vehicle has more than 90% localisation!  For information on contact details of Honda car dealers in Kolkata

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Honda Jazz Look

The Honda Jazz 2016 is based on the new Honda City and is 55mm longer than the previous generation. Honda internally calls this design as Crossfade Monoform design. The fascia of the Honda Jazz 2016 resembles the Honda City. It has a similar front grille, though it doesn’t get the chrome finish. Honda is targeting the Honda Jazz 2016 for the youth or those you prefer trendy styling over subtle. The headlamps are single barrel and the front bumpers are different from the City.

The side profile of the Honda Jazz 2016 is a lot similar to the previous generation as it still retains the same design philosophy like the quarter glass panel, blacked out pillars and the large glass-in area. The tail lamps and rear styling too remind you of the previous Jazz, but it does look fresh with LED tail lamps.

Honda Jazz Space

Open the large doors and an all black theme welcomes you. They do instill a sense of Deja Vu as the cabin borrows heavily from the Honda City. The centre console sits at the focus, and it comes with a very neat assortment of buttons and switches. The piano black finish for the entire console brings a premium aura to the entire cabin. We’re sure that you’ll love the 6.2-inch touch screen that is incorporated into the console, and a noteworthy point is that it comes along with DVD playback, navigation and can play music from a host of inputs.

Arranged right beneath this is a feather-touch climate control screen, with controls spread out right underneath it. While it does look cool and futuristic, operating it on the go is a bit of a bother. While we have no complaints on the performance of the air-conditioning, we have to point out that the fan is awfully loud.Integrated into the centre console, in front of the gear-knob are two cup holders. Three more storage slots have been put in place of the armrest, and this may go as a strong bonus for some, and a slash in comfort for others.

The steering wheel is just the right size and feels good to hold. However, it skips out on telescopic adjustment (VW Polo has it). The wheel is shared with the Honda City. The difference, notably, is the lack of cruise control buttons. The basic audio controls have been incorporated into the left, while the telephone buttons are placed behind the wheel.As for the instrument cluster, the dials lack the illuminated blue rings that you’d find in the City. The three-pod instrument cluster house the tachometer, speedometer and a multi-information display (MID). The MID reads out trip details and average fuel efficiency. The pod also houses an instantaneous FE meter, a readout for the outside temperature and the fuel gauge.

There is decent amount of bolstering for lateral support. Even people with heftier builds will have little reason to complain here. Cushioning is adequate and the seat also gets height adjustment. Getting into a comfortable driving position is not a big task, although a telescopic adjust on the steering wheel would have made it much easier. The rear bench is amongst the most spacious in its segment. Sitting three abreast is possible. Knee room and headroom are amongst the best in its class. A noteworthy feature is that the rear bench can recline by a couple of degrees to the back. For someone who dislikes the upright seating posture, the reclined posture keeps the lower back a lot happier.The Jazz also gets something Honda chooses to call ‘Magic Seats’. The rear bench can be folded in multiple combinations, enabling the user to tailor space according to his/her needs. A segment exclusive feature, which is sadly restricted to the top-variants.

Honda Jazz Gearbox

Under the stubby hood of the Jazz one can find either the popular 1.2-litre i-VTEC petrol or the relatively new 1.5-litre i-DTEC diesel motor. While the former is available with either a 5-speed manual or a CVT automatic, the diesel car gets a 6-speed manual similar to that of the new City. Starting with the petrol motor, this 1.2-litre unit is a familiar unit, previously seen in a range of Honda models including the Brio, the Amaze and even the old Jazz. Known for its refined nature and strong mid-range grunt, it produces 90bhp of power and 110Nm of torque, and in the new Jazz it retains those characteristics. During our stint behind the wheel, the petrol-powered Jazz felt fairly satisfying (if not thrilling) to drive, although I was bound to rev its absolute nuts off to make quick progress. Interestingly, the same engine in the Brio feels much stronger thanks to the car’s significantly less kerb weight. As for the gearbox, the 5-speed manual is also a familiar unit and like before, is a treat to go through the gears. Going by the spike in demand for diesel cars, it’s the diesel-powered Jazz that, in all probability, will be Honda’s new big seller; powered by a 1.5-litre i-DTEC four cylinder motor, the diesel Jazz pushes out 100bhp of power and a meaty 200Nm of torque – familiar numbers for Amaze and City users. It’s the same unit which has received a lot of blow from the users for its harshness and keeping that in mind, Honda says it has invested in additional noise and vibration absorption techniques to reduce NVH levels. So has it worked? Yes, to an extent. However, it is still not as refined as say a diesel Hyundai Elite i20 and the diesel clatter is evident nearly all the time. Honda, though, fights back with a stronger midrange and a comparatively linear power delivery than most vehicles in its class including the VW Polo GT TDI and the Elite i20.

As far as fuel efficiency goes, Honda is claiming up to 27.3 kmpl for the diesel Jazz, making it one of the most fuel efficient hatchbacks on sale today. However, we couldn’t better 16kmpl during our stint with the car, although it was mainly down to our heavy right foot and the fact that our test route included a lot of negotiating through traffic. The impressive figure, no doubt, was aided by the smooth shifting 6-speed manual gearbox which uses a slightly different set of ratios compared to the City.

Honda Jazz Driving

The ride quality of Honda Jazz 2016 is good and is also an improvement over earlier Hondas. It does a good job of absorbing the bumps. The Michelin Energy Saving tyres help to increase the fuel efficiency of the Honda Jazz 2016, however, they aren’t that sticky on the road. The handling of the Jazz is good. This along with the peppiness of the diesel, is a great combination. The steering feedback is excellent and it weighs up well. This is indeed one of the much better electronic power steerings in the market.

Honda Jazz Safety

The front passengers are shielded with the presence of dual airbags. An anti-lock braking system (ABS) and electronic brakeforce distribution (EBD) are offered as well. Along with this, you also get a rear parking camera, front fog lamps, driver seatbelt reminder, rear windshield defogger and an immobiliser.

Honda Jazz Cost in Hyderabad

Honda Jazz Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 7,50,867/- (Jazz V MT Petrol) to 9,30,186/- (Jazz VX MT Diesel). Get best offers for Honda Jazz from Honda Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Jazz price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Honda Jazz Bottomline

We Indians are hatchback crazy. It’s no secret that we simply cannot get enough of their practicality, ease of use or the low running costs and a few other distinct advantages that they have over sedans or SUVs. Needless to say, carmakers are well-versed with this trend and have actively introduced new and improved products over the years. And although a similar movement is taking place in the flourishing compact crossover space, it’s the hatchbacks that continue to demand a lot of time and effort from established carmakers. Honda, for one, is making all the right noises with the Jazz. The new Jazz certainly looks the part, has a versatile cabin with loads of space and for the first time – the efficiency of a diesel motor. It’s still not an enthusiast’s choice but that’s passable because it’s not what Honda was looking to make here. The Jazz is all about practicality and you get plenty of it.

React’s Five Fingers of Death. Master these five concepts, then master React.

A few years ago, my friend Sean started telling me how this brand new front-end library called React was going to take over the web. At first I dismissed it as just another framework fad. But then I started hearing about React more and more, to the point where I felt like ignoring it just wasn’t an option anymore.

Maybe you’re in the same position I was in: you’ve been hearing about React left and right, but actually sitting down and learning it feels like such a chore.

The good news is that you can boil everything you need to know about React down to five key concepts.

Now don’t get me wrong, this doesn’t mean I can turn you into a React master instantly. But at least you’ll understand all the major concepts, if you do decide to jump in.

The five key concepts are:

  1. Components
  2. JSX
  3. Props & State
  4. The Component API
  5. Component Types

Before we get started, note that I originally learned React through Wes Bos’s courses, and have included a few affiliate links to them. Whenever possible, I’ve also included links to free resources.

Oh, and my friend Sean? He’s since moved on to much more cutting-edge-ier things. After all, React is so 2015.

Concept #1: How React components work

The first thing you need to know about React is that it’s all about components. Your React codebase is basically just one large pile of big components that call smaller components.

But what’s a component, you ask? A perfect example of a component is the common <select> HTML element. Not only does it come with its own visual output (the grey box, text label, and downward arrow that make up the element itself) — it also handles its own opening and closing logic.

The classic <select>

Now imagine being able to build your own self-contained custom <select>, with its own style and behavior:

A fancier version of the good old <select>

Well, that’s exactly what React lets you do. A React component is a single object that not only outputs HTML like a traditional template would, but also includes all the code needed to control that output. For Web designing services check Vivid Designs

In practice, the most common way to write React components is as an ES6 class containing a render method that returns HTML. (There’s also a super-secret functional way, but you’ll have to wait until concept #4 to learn about it):

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>Hello World!<p>;
  }
}

Concept #2: How JSX works

As you can see, the component approach means that both HTML and JavaScript code live in the same file. React’s secret weapon to achieve this unholy alliance is the JSX language (where “X” stands for “XML”).

JSX might seem awkward at first, but you get used to it pretty fast.

Yes, I know. We’ve all been taught to maintain a strong separation between HTML and JavaScript. But it turns out that relaxing these rules a bit can actually do wonders for your front-end productivity.

For example, since you now have the full power of JavaScript at your disposal, here’s how you can display the current date by inserting a snippet of JavaScript in your HTML using {...}:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>Today is: {new Date()}</p>;
  }
}

This also means that you’ll use plain JavaScript for if statements or loops, rather than some kind of template-specific syntax. JavaScript’s ternary operator comes in especially handy here:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>Hello {this.props.someVar ?  'World' : 'Kitty'}</p>;
  }
}

And by the way, if you need to brush up on the newest points of JavaScript syntax, I recommend ES6 for Everyone by Wes Bos (if you like videos) or Practical ES6 by Nicolas Bevacqua (if you prefer reading).

Concept #3: How Props & State work

Maybe you’ve been wondering where the this.props.someVar variable above is coming from.

If you’ve ever written a line of HTML, you’re probably familiar with HTML attributes like the <a> tag’s href. In React, attributes are known as props(short for “properties”). Props are how components talk to each other.

class ParentComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <ChildComponent message="Hello World"/>;
  }
}
class ChildComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>And then I said, “{this.props.message}”</p>;
  }
}

Because of this, React’s data flow is unidirectional: data can only go from parent components to their children, not the other way around.

Sometimes though, a component needs to react to data that doesn’t come from a parent component (such as user input for example). And this is where the state comes in.

A good metaphor to understand the difference between props and state would be the Etch-A-Sketch. Unlike things like the body color and dial position of the Etch-A-Sketch tablet (props), the drawing itself (state) is not an inherent property of the Etch-A-Sketch. It’s just the temporary result of user input.

Note that a component’s state can also be passed on to its own children as a prop. You can think of this as a big river flowing downhill, with the router, data layer, and various components each adding their own little stream of data to form the main app state.

Inside a component, state is managed using the setState function, which is often called inside an event handler:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  handleClick = (e) => {
    this.setState({clicked: true});
  }
  render() {
    return <a href="#" onClick={this.handleClick}>Click me</a>;
  }
}

In practice, the vast majority of data in a React app will be a prop. It’s only when you need to accept user input that you’ll use state to handle the change.

Note that we’re using a fat arrow here to take care of binding the handleClickhandler. You can learn more about this technique here.

Concept #4: How the Component API works

We’ve already mentioned render and setState, which are both part of a small set of component API methods. Another useful one is the constructor, which you can use to initialize your state and bind methods.

Apart from these three functions, React also provides a set of callbacks triggered at various points during the component’s lifecycle (before loading, after loading, after unmounting, and so on). Unless you’re doing some advanced React voodoo, you’ll probably almost never need to worry about these.

If this section seems short, it’s because learning React is actually much more about mastering programming and architectural concepts rather than learning a set of boring API methods. This is what makes it so refreshing!

Concept #5: How Component Types work

We’ve seen how to use classes to define a component:

class MyComponent extends React.Component {
  render() {
    return <p>Hello World!<p>;
  }
}

And we’ve also talked about the component methods supported by these classes. Now forget all about them! More and more, people are writing React components as functional components.

A functional component is a function that takes a props object as argument, and returns a bunch of HTML. Almost like a traditional template, with the key difference that you can still use whatever JavaScript code you need inside that function:

const myComponent = props => {
  return <p>Hello {props.name}! Today is {new Date()}.</p>
}

The consequence of using the functional component syntax is that you lose access to the component methods we just talked about. But it turns out that in practice that’s perfectly fine, since the vast majority of your components probably won’t need them. Web development company in Hyderabad visit Vivid Designs 

By the way, one of these methods is setState, and this means functional components cannot have state. For that reason they’re often referred to as stateless functional components.

Since functional components require much less boilerplate code, it makes sense to use them whenever possible. For this reason, most React apps contain a healthy mix of both syntaxes.

Note that there’s also a third, legacy syntax using the createClass function. But anybody using it should be shamed and called names for daring to still be using coding patterns from 18 months ago:

var Greeting = React.createClass({ 
  
  render: function() {     
    return <h1>Hello, {this.props.name}</h1>;   
  }
});

Concept #6: How Component Roles work

OK, I lied. There are actually six things, not five. But what can I say, the movie isn’t called “Six Fingers Of Death.” Although now that I think about it, that sounds like it’d be a pretty cool movie, probably involving some kind of alien kung-fu master seeking revenge.

But back to the topic at hand. Now come the boring architectural concepts I was talking about. So if none of this makes sense feel free to come back once you’ve had a chance to play with React some more.

After using React for a while, people started seeing two distinct “flavors” of code appear in their components: one flavor was concerned with UI logic such as showing and hiding thing. And the other was all about data logic, such as loading data from your server.

This led to the distinction between container and presentationalcomponents (also sometimes known as “smart” and “dumb” components). Container components should handle your data, but — and this is the important part — not your UI. Presentational components are just the opposite.

Google image result for “smart component”. I have no clue what this is. Image credit

In other words, in the classic to-do list example, one component will load the data, and then pass that data on to a different component that will be in charge of outputting the actual HTML markup and handling local state changes.

This is very similar to the view/controller pattern you might be familiar with from your back-end developer days. (’member Rails? ’member Django?)

The container/presentational distinction was popularized in this blog post by Dan Abramov (the creator of Redux), and I recommend checking it out if you want to dig deeper.

Higher-Order Components

Before we wrap things up, we should talk a bit about a type of container components known as higher-order components (often shortened as HoCs).

A HoC is a component that you can wrap around another component to pass it special props, and it’s typically created using a higher-order component factory function. Note that people commonly refer to the function itself as a “HoC”, which might not be 100% correct technically, but isn’t a big deal in practice.

As an example, calling React Router’s withRouter factory function on <MyComponent>will wrap it in a new<withRouter(MyComponent)/> component that passes the Router prop to the afore-mentioned <MyComponent>.

You can think of a HoC function as a golf caddie that follows their golfer around and hands them the club they need it. By themselves, the caddie can’t actually do anything with the golf clubs. They’re just there to give the golfer access to more tools.

HoCs are a very powerful concept. For example, the Recompose library even lets you handle state changes through HoCs. In other words, you can now manage state without having to involve any ES6 class-based components.

With HoC composition becoming so common, it seems like React might be moving away from the ES6 class syntax and more towards a purely functional approach. Interesting times!

Recap

So let’s recap what we’ve just learned:

  • A React codebase is made up of components.
  • These components are written using JSX.
  • Data flows from parent to children, except when it comes to state, which originates inside a component.
  • Components possess a small set of lifecycle and utility methods.
  • Components can also be written as pure functions.
  • You should keep data logic and UI logic in separate components.
  • Higher-order components are a common pattern for giving a component access to new tools.

Believe it or not, we’ve just covered 90% of the knowledge used by a React developer on a daily basis. No matter how abstract or obscure the pattern, everything in React can always be boiled down to functions and props.

Once you truly understand this, React will stop being scary. You’ll be able to see patterns in the code, understand new codebases at a glance, and only then will you be able to proudly proclaim:

“Pfff! React is so 2015!”

Going Further

If I’ve managed to convince you that React isn’t so bad, you might want to take a stab at learning it properly. If so, I can’t recommend the React for Beginnersvideo course enough. It’s how I learned React myself, and it’s actually just been updated to cover all the cool new stuff like functional stateless components:

If you don’t want your hard-earned dollars to finance the nefarious React lobby (I heard Dan Abramov is onto his third yacht), you can also learn for free by checking out this huge list of React resources.

And if you need to put all this newly-acquired knowledge in practice by contributing to a cool React open-source project, check out Telescope Nova. It’s the easiest way to quickly create a full-stack React + GraphQL app, complete with user accounts, forms, and data loading out of the box. And did I mention we’re looking for contributors?

Finally, if you’ve enjoyed this article, please share it and recommend it (that little green heart just below). And please let me know on Twitter what you’d like me to write about next!

Source

Get a ‘Portable’ Virtual Phone Number For Your Small Business

In the past, clients and consumers were wary of businesses operating from their homes. Knowing this, many home business owners sought ways, many of which were expensive, to hide the fact they worked home. They’d obtain a box at a local mail store and hire an answering service. Today, home based businesses are normal and only a few clients or consumers question it. Further, the options to create a professional identity, have become more affordable. Check for Virtual Phone Number For Your Small Business in Linkedphone

For a small business, virtual PBX services are a godsend. They provide a small business with all of the bells and whistles of a robust, business-class phone system for as low as $10/ month.They work with your existing phone lines; they have cool apps that make them easy to manage; they make it possible for your whole team to be contacted through one number; and they are easy to scale. There is one catch that you should be aware of: the number you are assigned through a virtual PBX service may not be “portable.”

What does it mean for a number to not be portable? It means that you can’t take the number with you if you decide to change services. Unlike cell phone services, residential and business VoIP phone services, and traditional landline companies, virtual PBX services are not required by the FTC to let you take your number with you (unless it’s an 800 number) to another service.

There are two solutions to this problem:

1 Sign up with a virtual PBX provider that allows you to port your number out. (RingCentral Mobile is a high quality service that we have verified does allow this.)

2 Sign up with whichever virtual PBX provider you prefer that doesn’t charge for porting a number into the service and verify that you like the service. (Most don’t, but you can double check that the one you like doesn’t by looking at the “Numbers” section of our Detailed Reviews grid, such as this one for Phone.com.) Then, sign up with a low cost phone service provider that doesn’t require a long term contract (like a residential VoIP provider). Port your number from the low cost phone service provider to the virtual PBX service and then cancel the phone service.

The first method is the easiest and the cheapest. The second method is significantly more complicated, but it will ensure that the number is legally yours according to the FTC.

2017 is the year that front-end developers should go back and master the basics

In our fast-paced ecosystem, we tend to spend our time trying out the latest inventions, then arguing about them on the internet.

I’m not saying we shouldn’t do that. But we should probably slow down a bit and take a look at the things that don’t change all that much. Not only will this improve the quality of our work and the value we deliver — it will actually help us learn these new tools faster.

This post is a mix of my experience and my wishes for the New Year. And I want to hear your suggestions in the comments just as much as I want to share my own. For Web designing services check Vivid Designs

Learn how to write readable code

Most of our work lies not in writing new code, but maintaining existing code. That means you end up reading code much more often then writing it, so you need to optimize your code for the next programmer, not for the interpreter.

I recommend reading these three amazing books — in this order, from shortest to longest:

  • The Art of Readable Code by Dustin Boswell
  • Clean Code: A Handbook of Agile Software Craftsmanship by Robert C. Martin
  • Code Complete: A Practical Handbook of Software Construction by Steve McConnell
  • Learn JavaScript deeper

    When every week we have a new JavaScript framework that’s better than any older framework, it’s easy to spend most of your time learning frameworks rather than the language itself. If you’re using a framework but don’t understand how it works, stop and start learning the language until you understand how the tools you use work.

    • A great start is Kyle Simpson’s book series You Don’t Know JavaScript, which you can read online for free.
    • Eric Elliott has a huge list of JavaScript topics to learn in 2017.
    • Henrique Alves has a list of things you should know before using React(actually any framework).
    • JavaScript Developers: Watch Your Language by Mike Pennisi — understand TC-39 process for new ECMAScript features.

    Learn functional programming

    For years we wanted classes in JavaScript. Now we finally have them but don’t want to use them anymore. Functions are all we want! We even write HTML using functions (JSX).

    • Functional-Light JavaScript by Kyle Simpson.
    • Professor Frisby’s Mostly adequate guide to functional programming ebook and his free course.
    • Learn design basics

      As front-end developers, we’re closer to users than anybody else on the team — maybe even closer than designers. And if designers have to verify every pixel you put on screen, you’re doing something wrong.

      • Design for Hackers: a book and a free course by David Kadavy.
      • Design for Non-Designers talk by Tracy Osborn.
      • Design of Web Applications by Nathan Barry.
      • On Web Typography by Jason Santa Maria.
      • The Inmates Are Running the Asylum: Why High Tech Products Drive Us Crazy and How to Restore the Sanity by Alan Cooper.
      • A few articles on animation in UI: How to Use Animation to Improve UX, Transitional Interfaces.

      Learn how to work with humans

      Some of us come to programming because we prefer to interact with computers more than with humans. Unfortunately, that’s not how it works.

      We rarely work in isolation: we have to talk to other developers, designers, managers — and sometimes even users. That’s hard. But it’s important if you want to really understand what you’re doing and why, because that’s where the value in what we do lies.

      • Soft Skills: The software developer’s life manual by John Sonmez.
      • The Clean Coder: A Code of Conduct for Professional Programmers by Robert C. Martin.
      • Start with No: The Negotiating Tools that the Pros Don’t Want You to Knowby Jim Camp.

      Learn how to write for humans

      A big portion of communication with our colleagues and other people are textual: task descriptions and comments, code comments, Git commits, chat messages, emails, tweets, blog posts, etc.

      Imagine how much time people spend reading and understanding all that. If you can reduce this time by writing more clearly and concisely, the world will be a better place to work. Best web development company in Hyderabad visit Vivid Designs 

      • On Writing Well: The Classic Guide to Writing Nonfiction by William Zinsser.
      • The Elements of Style by William Strunk and E. B. White.
      • Orwell’s rules on writing.
      • In Russian: awesome Glavred course.

      Learn the old computer science wisdom

      Front-end development isn’t just animated dropdown menus any more. It’s more complicated than ever before. Part of that notorious “JavaScript fatigue” stems from the increased complexity of the tasks we have to solve.

      This, however, means that it’s time to learn from all wisdom that non-front-end developers have built up over the decades. And this is where I want to hear your recommendations the most.

      Here are a couple resources I personally would recommend on this:

      • Learn To Think Like A Computer Scientist course at Coursera.
      • The five programming books that meant most to me by DHH
      • Source

The Features And Considerations Of Large Office Phone Systems

Small offices can improve their level of professionalism by adding small office phone systems. Though many forms of communication exist for small businesses, a phone call is often the most convenient and easiest way to contact a business. A professional small office phone system can help business owners route calls, handle a large call volume and even host conference calls. Check for Features And Considerations Of Large Office Phone Systems  in Linkedphone

Large office phone systems are the heart of any business industry; clients and employees must communicate effectively for the best sales possible. However, current phone technology offers so many different features and modules that it can be difficult to sort through the myriad of options. A few key considerations should be evaluated before deciding on a system; many sales can turn sour if a client feels uncomfortable with the level of communication and support through the phone system.

Big businesses will normally have a main calling number and subsequent extensions for each employee or department area. These phone trees must be properly installed and maintained to prevent any dropped calls and unhappy customers. When you are shopping for large office phone systems, it is a good practice to stay with a wired configuration; wireless use within a building can generate a lot of interference. Multiple wireless phones feeding off of one phone system can easily become static-filled, effectively preventing a civil conversation between parties. Large wired phone systems have permanent lines that are not prone to interference, regardless of the phone quantity in a small area.

Features and Considerations

The overall system should be user-friendly to callers. If a computer response must be used for incoming calls, the system should be configured to allow the caller to choose a particular extension or offer the option of listing extensions by employee name or department. However, there should always be a choice on all large office phone systems to speak to a receptionist; the human element provides an out for the caller if they cannot pinpoint the needed department. As a result, the receptionist will be fresh for callers needing help instead of routing hundreds of calls that can wear down the person’s genuine greeting throughout the day.Every phone system has dozens of features; a business should make sure that the basics are always included: caller ID, call waiting, and voice mail. Depending on the phone system’s manufacturer, the caller ID display should be programmable. Personnel should be able to add client names and phone numbers to the system so that they are immediately identified as an important caller. For example, an employee is on the phone with a colleague. The call waiting and caller ID alerts the employee that an important client is calling. As a result, the employee can communicate with the client, rather than missing the call altogether.

Before deciding on one of the many large office business phone systems, the business should make sure that they have an administrator to oversee the network. The installing phone company should train the administrator, as well as the employees, during the sales process, but day-to-day operations will be the responsibility of a phone administrator. Voice mail access problems and dropped calls may need to be troubleshot immediately to keep the day’s communication lines open.Does your business have a lot of international calls? Long distance charges with a local telephone provider can add up quickly and effectively wipe out any monthly profits. Luckily, modern technology has an alternative: VoIP. Voice over Internet protocol allows people to use an Internet connection for communicating throughout the world, rather than using the basic telephone wires strung across the world. As a result, long distance charges are removed from the monthly phone budget. In addition, VoIP service is typically less expensive than local telephone access since physical wires do not need to be maintained by the phone entity.

Another factor to large office phone systems is the installing and maintenance company’s treatment of their clients. A business does not simply hire a phone installer for a basic install and then never contact them again. In fact, your company will work with them a lot for hardware and software upgrades, as well as any repair issues that may arise. A good rule is to talk to other large businesses about their phone installation experiences; many times, you can find a good contractor by word of mouth.An effective installing company will listen to your business needs and implement the features that match well with the requests. They should offer initial training and periodic continuing information sessions; software and hardware updates should also match with another training period so users are familiar with the new modules or phone procedures. Lastly, business managers should verify warranty coverage for all hardware and software portions of the system to ensure a safety net if there is a major failure.In the end, each business should shop around for different quotes from a variety of vendors. Your best deal can be found when companies compete for your business.

Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 Review & Test Drive

Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 Overview

Expensive, inefficient, and sluggish- these are just a few of the terms commonly associated with automatics. However, this trend is fast changing and a big contributor in bringing this change in perception has been the AMT or the Automated Manual Transmission technology. Maruti took the first step and brought in the Celerio AMT. At just a premium of 50k over the standard manual and with no loss in performance or fuel efficiency, the Celerio AMT was quick to garner a considerable popularity. A year after the successful introduction of the Celerio AMT, Maruti, once again, gave us the cheapest automatic money could buy in the form of the Alto K10 AMT (Now the second cheapest due to the advent of Nano GenX AMT ). The Alto K10, with the 1.0 litre K series motor, has always been a fun little hatch. So how good is it with the 5-speed AMT? Read what we think about this entry level automatic in our Maruti Alto K10 AMT review here. Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 On road price starts from 3,39,652-. Check for price details of Alto K10 in CarzPrice.

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Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 Exteriors

The Alto K10 is 125mm longer and 55 kgs heavier then its F8 sibling, which is something you won’t really notice, what you would however notice is the new headlights, grille, bumper, fog lamps, mirrors and tail lamps. Although all this is nothing revolutionary, it is a welcome change considering the company had a price target to meet. The Alto K10 looks modern with these changes, but does not really stand out of the crowd (which the Beat does). Door mouldings and body coloured bumpers gel well with the overall design of the car. A chrome strip now runs on top of the front grille, which is now larger.The full wheel cover design seems to have been inspired from the Swift wheel cover. They look decent.The rear tail lamp design seem to have some sort of inspiration from the Chevrolet Spark.

Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 Interiors

The interior of the Maruti Alto K10 is totally fresh when compared to its 800cc sibling. The console and the dash has a black and beige tone with the instrument cluster having features like the USB option and aux input and a mp3 player. The buttons are big and clear and hence easy and convenient to use. This new centre console is a welcome after the old Alto 800 styling, which does look outdated.

The Maruti Alto K10 gets new rich beige fabric seats to add a pinch of richness in the cabin. The cabin space is sufficient and feels airy. The front row seats are comfortable for even long drives. In the second row there is sufficient kneeroom even for tall people and there is enough head room as well, but the thigh support could have been better.

Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 Engine

The Alto K10 AMT has the same engine and transmission pair as the Celerio, but thanks to a lower weight, the Alto K10 feels a wee bit quicker. It is very sprightly off the line and it’s only when you reach speeds north of 70-80 km/h that the engine starts feeling a bit strained. The biggest talking point here, however, is the 5-speed AMT. This unit feels smooth and the jerks at lower rpms are well contained. When driven with a light foot the gear changes are relaxed and happen at a relatively low rpm

Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 Driving

Drive it with a steady foot and the shifts happen smoothly. It progresses from the first to second at an engine speed of 2500 to 3000 rpm. The same band is repeated if the throttle response is increased gradually. It is only the initial shift where a mild lag is experienced but as the engine makes up sufficient speed, the transmission too works at tandem. If driven with a heavy foot, the shifting points of the transmission are shifted to higher points making the engine breathe longer between shifts to produce a greater power delivery. This is useful during overtaking.

Shifting from automated to manual mode takes place in a jiffy. In the manual mode, the engine holds on to higher speeds reaching a peak of 6000rpm. This takes care of spirited style of driving with a quick downshift availing a wide range of engine speed. The downshifts in particular happen without any hassle. The up shifts aren’t as smooth but do their job in shifting to lower gears as soon as the engine speed drops. View offers & discounts on Maruti Cars from Maruti dealers in Hyderabad at Autozhop

Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 Safety

On the features side, you do get air-conditioning across all variants as standard with power windows coming in only on the higher VXi variant. This variant also gets airbags but there is no ABS anywhere, not even as an option. Whats also strange is that the Alto is one of the very few cars to still offer just one wing mirror on the base LX and the LXi variant as standard which is simply poor manufacturer attitude towards safety

Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 Price

Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 Ex-Showroom Price in India ranges from 3,39,652/- (Alto K10 LX) to 4,24,108/- (Alto K10 LXI CNG Optional). Get best offers for Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 from Maruti Suzuki Dealers in India

Maruti Suzuki Alto K10 Verdict

At an ex-showroom price of just 4 lacs, the Alto K10 AMT oozes practicality. It is no longer the cheapest one around with the Tata Nano coming in at a lakh less, but it is definitely more upmarket and comes with a very peppy 1.0 litre motor. It may not be as dynamically sorted or as good looking as we would have liked it to be, but it does make those long daily commutes that much easier without the usual cost of owning an automatic being reflected in your bank balance. Kudos to Maruti for plonking the 1.0 litre K-Series motor in the Alto and coupling it with the 5-speed AMT! The Alto K10 AMT is surely among the most sensible hatchbacks around. Thus car will not win many traffic-light GPs, it won’t encourage you to attack corners, and it will not turn many heads either. But it will keep your left foot happy and make those boring daily commutes through jam-packed roads that much easier, without burning a big hole in your pocket. Practical and peppy, the Alto K10 impresses!

Maruti Suzuki Celerio Engine & Test Drive

Maruti Suzuki Celerio Overview

After a remarkably quiet 2013 Maruti Suzuki has begun spreading its gigantic wings all over 2014. They begin the year with a brand new offering aimed squarely at the Indian market. The Celerio, if you aren’t aware of it by now, is a hatchback that will eventually replace the A-Star and the Estilo.The Celerio is built on an all-new platform that has been in the making for close to three and a half years. A team of around 175 designers, engineers, product planners, visualisers, marketeers etc from both India and Japan have combined their efforts to this end. Except whoever came up with a name that sounds like a veggie in a salad mated to Mahindra’s favourite latter is anyone’s guess. According to Mayank Pareek, COO Maruti Suzuki, Celerio means a ‘celestial river’, but don’t ask me what’s the connect, I’m as clueless as you and many Maruti Suzuki employees are!   Maruti Suzuki Celerio price range in India is between 4,29,489/- to 5,48,773/- , check for detail pricing of Celerio in Carzprice

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But get past the name and what you can clearly see its antecedents in the Alto, there are definitely faint hints of inspiration from Maruti’s largest selling car.

Maruti Suzuki Celerio Exteriors

The Celerio is 3.6-metres long (2.4 metre wheelbase), 1.6-metres wide and 1.5-metres high, making it much larger than the A-Star. Its silhouette has all the elements of the small Suzuki hatchback language, but the fascia and the design is completely new. The front design is part of Suzuki’s new design language with a curved two stat grille connecting the headlamps. The headlamp console and the front bumper are angular giving it a modern feel.

Both the shoulder-line and waist-line are bold, but they don’t add much value in this small car. The top-end variant gets a nice set of alloy-wheels. The rear is typical Maruti with the tail lamp cluster similar to that of the bigger siblings. There are multiple horizontal lines here that actually make the car look more compact from this angle

Maruti Suzuki Celerio Interiors

Maruti Celerio CNG interiors are same as the other versions. It looks quite contemporary and is good value for the money spent. The Celerio has a dual-tone dashboard with beige and black colours. The finish is also good which makes it look premium. The CNG comes only in VXi, so it doesn’t get a factory-fitted music system, no ABS or airbags. here would be an addition of ABS, once the new regulations set in, but as of now you get neither. The features on the Maruti Celerio CNG are all four power windows, power steering, AC and integrated dual fuel gauges.

The Maruti Celerio CNG gets dual tone seats, which also look stylish. The space offered in the front row is good enough for tall people and the seats have decent support too. The best part is that the rear also has great leg room and knee room. Even tall passengers would find it comfortable to sit in. It is certainly good and comfortable too, but the limited thigh support could have been optimised. The CNG tank takes up all the space, hence there is hardly any luggage space in the boot. So, the only option will be to use a carrier for luggage.

Maruti Suzuki Celerio Engine

Yes going by the facts, the Celerio diesel can be a bit of a dampener. Two cylinders, 793cc, 47.6PS of power at a fairly low 3,500rpm and 125Nm of torque at 2,000rpm. But don’t write it off yet. The Celerio is a light car, about 60kg lighter than its competition, and when it goes down to such small capacity engines, every kilo matters. The engine itself is an all-aluminium block with a turbo’s diameter the size of a few fingers. Performance isn’t anywhere close to brisk, but adequate to keep pace with traffic, and a downshift will help you in that overtake.

A weak bottom end is expected with just 125Nm of peak torque available at a fairly high 2,000 rpm but the way around it is keeping the engine in its midrange. The engine isn’t as vibey and noise inside the cabin is well-curtailed to give you a pleasant drive most of the time. Towards the top of the rev band though above 3,000rpm, as the tiny two-pot begins to shriek is when you will find the Celerio a bit unpleasant. The shift quality is good though, clean and quick slots with a clutch that’s a bit heavy but not jumpy.

All things said, the Celerio diesel is a car for the office commute for two. Any more passengers or luggage loaded and the engine will feel strained and out of breath to lug the extra weight

Maruti Suzuki Celerio Driving

The suspension is soft enough to iron out road imperfections but the light car that it is, allows Maruti to keep the tune stiff enough for the Celerio to feel composed at high speeds. You don’t feel as nervous north of 100kmph in the Celerio as you would in an i10. The Celerio is a predictable handler too, fun to chuck around corners when you pick up the pace but the tyres could have offered more grip, especially in the diesel as there is more weight up front.

It is a given that a Maruti has to be an easy car to use in the city, and with the Celerio it’s no different. Light steering and good visibility out of the cabin coupled with nearly straight lined sides make for some precision driving when you are weaving through traffic. If there is one drawback in the diesel, it’s the lack of low end punch. View offers on Maruti Cars from Maruti dealers in Hyderabad at Autozhop

Maruti Suzuki Celerio Cost

Maruti Suzuki Celerio Ex-Showroom Price in India ranges from 4,29,489/- (Celerio LXI) to 5,48,773/- (Celerio ZXI AMT Optional). Get best offers for Maruti Suzuki Celerio from Maruti Suzuki Dealers in India

Maruti Suzuki Celerio Verdict

The Celerio CNG is one of the most affordable hatchback in its segment and is the perfect package. The Wagon R’s interiors have started to look aged and the Celerio is a better option to pick as you will look at keeping the car for a period of three to five years. At the price and the mileage, Celerio CNG is a great buy. Wish it was also available in the ZXi variant also

Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 Review & Test Drive

Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 Overview

If you do a simple random sampling of a group of Indians who know how to drive, chances are a majority of them would have learnt driving on an Alto. Ever since Maruti Suzuki first launched it in September 2000, as many as 30 lakh units of this entry-level hatchback have been cumulatively sold in the country. The car’s unique selling points have been its remarkable fuel efficiency, peppy engine, attractive price and low maintenance. Add to that Maruti’s countrywide sales network—you can practically buy an Alto even if you live in the remotest town in India! Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 price range in India is between 2,58,975/- to 3,84,414/- , check for detail pricing of Alto 800 in Carzprice

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Yet another reason for its success is that the Alto has been evolving to reflect the changing India. Over the years, Maruti has been arming it with just the right features a buyer looks for in an entry-level car, and subtle but timely design updates; these have been appealing to customers.

Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 Exteriors

The styling of the Maruti Alto 800 looks far from impressive. The old Alto looked cute even thought it has been around for more than a decade. With the Alto 800, Maruti Suzuki has just tried to bring styling from the Japanese Alto and the A-Star, which doesn’t give the Alto 800 an identity of its own. The Alto 800 has very compact dimensions and the company has added new bits to make the vehicle look modern. A new and lighter roof has been added with corrugations to boost stability. New outside rear view mirror has been picked up from the Alto K10 but its shocking too see no left side rear view mirror as standard. The door handles are body colored but the rear view mirror is not. The full wheel caps look good and the wheel arches are slightly flared too. The increased height and high ground clearance makes the Alto 800 look odd. The Alto 800 is thus, no match for the well styled Hyundai Eon. The conservative styling doesn’t appeal much and the Alto 800 ends up looking very disproportionvate.

Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 Interiors

Things are quite different on the inside. You now get a dark grey tone for the dashboard and new upholstery on the door pads and seats. The front seats are decent in comfort while frontal visibility is also excellent. The Alto gets a basic audio system, front power windows, power steering and AC. The AC has good performance and it fared nicely in our hot weather. With the facelift, the Alto 800 now gets a standard left hand side mirror, child locks at the rear and an optional driver-side airbag.

At the rear, you have good head room while leg room is also pretty decent thanks to the thin front seats. Shoulder space is decent but fitting 3 passengers at the rear could be a problem. However, the seats are lacking in terms of under-thigh support. You also feel a bit claustrophobic due to the small window area. The rear seats now come with integrated head rests. The rear doors finally get child locks now. There is a bottle header in front of the gear lever which can hold a 1-litre bottle. There is also a small storage area above the glovebox. The boot is pretty compact at 177-litres

Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 Engine

Mechanically, the new 2016 Alto 800 remain unchangeds. This means that powering the refreshed Alto 800 is the tried and tested Suzuki F8D 796 cc, three-cylinder engine that comes mated to a 5 speed manual gearbox. This motor pumps out a max. power of 47.65 PS @ 6,000 rpm and a peak torque of 69 Nm @ 3500 rpm. The Alto is available in both Petrol and CNG avatars. Maruti could give the engine an ECU remap to further optimize the fuel mileage. As we said, the Diesel model of the Alto 800 won’t be launched anytime soon. However, powering the Diesel Alto will be a 800 cc, twin-cylinder engine that has a maximum power of 47.5 PS and peak torque of 120 Nm. View offers on Maruti Cars from Maruti dealers in Hyderabad at Autozhop

Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 Driving

The Alto 800 has a feedback rich steering though it feels a bit heavy at crawling speeds. However, the steering is very direct and despite being such a small car, the Alto is quite fun to drive. Thanks to its small footprint, you can easily drive it around and tackling too much traffic doesn’t get easier than this. The ride is very flat at low speeds and it tends to get uncomfortable when you hit broken or uneven surfaces at even moderately high speeds. The car remains decently stable at high speeds but it’d be best if it is driven below 90 km/hr. The body feels very light and the super thin tyres have questionable grip levels.

Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 Price

Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 Ex-Showroom Price in India ranges from 2,58,975/- (Alto 800 Standard) to 3,84,414/- (Alto 800 LXI CNG Optional). Get best offers for Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 from Maruti Suzuki Dealers in India

Maruti Suzuki Alto 800 Conclussion

Maruti Suzuki hasn’t made many changes to the Alto 800, which is essentially the Alto in fresh clothing, with slight upgrades here and there. What this results in, is a much better Alto overall but is it enough considering this is the first facelift to the Alto in 12-years. While Maruti Suzuki’s brand name is more than enough to keep the Alto’s sales flying high, we were hoping for a vastly improved Alto to compete with the likes of the Hyundai Eon. However, the changes to the Alto are more than welcome and the refreshed exteriors, new dashboard, marginally more space, slightly more eager engine and better quality of plastics is enough to justify the Rs. 30,000/- price hike which is expected on the new Alto

Nissan Sunny Engine & Transmission

Nissan Sunny Overview

The small car segment in India has continuously been explored and re-explored by manufacturers in the pursuit of having the correct ingredients in their car. While some car makers have found them, others haven’t. But it is the entry level sedan segment that is still to be exploited to its full potential. Nissan has now brought its internationally launched Versa under the Sunny tag to India, in an attempt to make a breakthrough in the segment. Although there are only five cars in the segment, each one has a USP of its own, making it very difficult for a buyer to make his choice. While the Suzuki Swift Dzire is the class leader offering great mileage and a peppy drive with great after sales service, Toyota offers refinement and comfort with its Etios. And let’s not forget the sleekly styled Tata Manza and the highly affordable Mahindra Verito. The question is what does the Sunny have to offer? Is it the segment shaker Nissan wishes it to be? For information on contact details of Nissan car dealers in Chennai

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Nissan Sunny Style

This is a facelift, so the basic shape of the Sunny is retained. However, the front is where major changes have been wrought, beginning with a new, chromed trapezoid grille and massive boomerang-shaped headlamps. The chrome doesn’t stop at the grille, the new, aggressive bumper is underscored with chrome and the fog lamps also have L-shaped chrome underlining as well. It may get a little too in-your-face for some, but this is not a bad thing, because it is certainly an improvement over the outgoing model’s bland face. The three-quarter panel reveals a new, more angular mirror housing with integrated signals. Nissan hasn’t done a halfway job with these, either: the original signals have disappeared from the fenders. The alloy wheels have a new six split ‘Y’ shaped spokes, but the tyres remain the same size as before. Our test car was shod with JK Vectras instead of the standard Bridgestones it used to be shod with. The roof also exhibits a single change – the long, thin antenna has made way for a rear-mounted shorter, thicker aerial. At the rear, not much has changed. The tail-lamps remain the same, but the rear bumper has changed. The corners get an extra horizontal crease that rises towards the rear. This, coupled with the new matt black underside that cuts into the visible area at the low end of the bumper helps reduce the visual height of the rear more neatly than the previous car’s busy, all-painted triple horizontal creases low down on the bumper. The chrome strip above the number plate on the top-spec variants is now a more complex piece, and under it hides the reversing camera. None of the Sunny’s sheet metal has changed, but it is marginally longer and taller than before. It will also be available with a new paint scheme, a deep metallic purple that appears black until you view it in bright sunlight, when it shows off its true colours. This same paint used to be available on the previous-generation Honda City, and its appeal has not diminished at all with the 2014 Nissan Sunny.

Nissan Sunny Cabin

Nissan had updated the Micra last year and that facelift had transformed the interiors of the car drastically. Similar changes now flow into the Sunny, which also gets a new centre console with piano black finishing. The AC controls see minor changes while Nissan has made heavy changes to the dashboard of the car. The instrument cluster gets a new fine vision meter which changes the way the console is lit, the multi-information display now getting white lighting. Lower variants still get a basic cluster. The steering wheel too has been ditched for a new and sportier unit. The new 3-spoke steering feels much better to hold and doesn’t come across as too big, the audio control buttons having a slick feel. The beige and grey interior has been replaced by an all black interior which looks so much better, invoking a sporty feel inside the cabin.

The rest of the Nissan Sunny remains identical. You get a cabin which truly has acres and acres of space, more so for rear passengers who can sit and stretch like they are in a lounge with 636 mm of legroom, easily class leading. Good headroom, decent under-thigh support (a bit lacking for tall passengers at the rear), two reading lights at the rear (there are four cabin lights), a chiller of an AC (with rear fan vents which pull AC air from the front), all play a big role in ensuring the Sunny is among the best cars in its class to be chauffeur driven in, the airy cabin further accentuating the backseat appeal. Our only gripe with the cabin is the doors don’t auto lock. Nissan has given the Sunny Bluetooth connectivity and the 2-DIN audio system with a 5.1-inch screen is new as well. The top variants (XV and XV Premium) also get reverse parking sensors and a reverse camera. The XV Premium variant is available in two optional packs – Safety Pack adds side airbags while Luxury Pack consists of genuine leather seats along with a leather wrapped gear knob.

Nissan Sunny Performance

The Sunny’s 1.5-litre, twin-cam, 16-valve petrol motor (codename: HR15) makes a decent 97bhp and 13.6kgm of torque. Down from 1.6 litres as in other markets, this 1.5 also has only one injector per cylinder, as opposed to two. But because it doesn’t have much mass to move, you will find it performs more than adequately. Its 12.6sec 0-100kph time is no match for a Honda City or a Toyota Etios, but isn’t too far off a VW Vento’s and you can see this in the way it drives. The 1498cc motor’s almost ‘square’ cylinder dimensions work at making part-throttle responses peppy and giving it decent mid-range and top-end power. The best bit about this engine is how well it pulls from low speeds, which makes city driving quite a breeze.

Power delivery is quite linear all the way to the 6500rpm redline, but isn’t as smooth or willing to be revved as, say, a 1.5-litre Honda City motor. It gets quite thrashy past 5000rpm and the Sunny works best when you upshift early and use the engine’s good part-throttle responses and excellent low-rpm performance to get you to speed. It’s easy enough to maintain cruising speeds, and overtaking doesn’t require too much downshifting.

The five-speed manual gearbox has a well-judged set of ratios, but the gearshift feels a bit notchy and there’s a fair bit of transmission whine as well. However, the clutch is light and this takes some effort off the gearshifts.As for fuel efficiency, it sipped a litre to travel 11.5km in the city, and 16.4km on the highway, and that’s better than a Honda City.

Nissan Sunny Rideing

The front MacPherson strut and the rear torsion bar suspension set-up works well for the Sunny and is a blessing on the kind of roads found in India. It is very forgiving and can take on any pothole or bump without sending you straight to the first spinal cord clinic en route! This works against the Vettel types who would seem to be all at sea with the car wallowing in the high speed corners but then there is always the 370Z and the GTR for this lot. Excellent ground clearance is another major attribute for our terrain, yes, urban and rural and thanks are also due to the 185/65-R15 tyres (ours was the top-of-the-line offering which has this size rubber while the other two versions make do with 185/70-R14 Bridgestones) for the fine poise and the ride quality. Among the other positive attributes of this big ’un in a very competitive segment poised for take-off is the fine and comfortable driving position with ample all-round visibility coupled to a very light yet precise steering. Both of these make themselves felt and count when gliding through traffic on our city roads despite the obvious girth of the vehicle.

Nissan Sunny Safety

One area where the Sunny scores is its fuel efficiency. The light weight and moderately powerful engines mean that the Sunny is not particularly thirsty. Nissan India claims the diesel Sunny manages 22 km/l in test conditions and the petrol CVT is close to 18 km/l. Of course, real world figures are lower, but oour experience has been that the Sunny really is among the most fuel efficient mid-size sedans in the country.

Nissan Sunny Cost in Hyderabad

Nissan Sunny Ex-Showroom Price in Hyderabad ranges from 6,97,988/- (Sunny XE Petrol) to 9,50,497/- (Sunny XV Diesel). Get best offers for Nissan Sunny from Nissan Dealers in Hyderabad. Check for Sunny price in Hyderabad at Carzprice

Nissan Sunny Bottomline

There is no doubt in the fact that the Nissan Sunny facelift has definitely improved a lot in terms of its appearance while its upgraded interiors provides a much more premium feel inside. The diesel engine now returns an impressive fuel efficiency which will definitely attract lot of attention. Overall if you are looking for a spacious cabin with quality interiors and are not at all worried about the performance bit of your sedan then the Nissan Sunny won’t disappoint you at all.